Category Archives: Engineering Technology and Managment

What To Do When I’m Not Studying…

Ross Lowry

Ross Lowry,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 10 December 2014

Finals week is in full swing, meaning sleep and motivation are at an all-time low, with stress at an all- time high. To be successful during finals week, you can’t burn yourself out. It is too easy to, and many students find themselves falling victim to this. My best advice, take breaks! It doesn’t matter if its two minutes or two hours, but you have to let your brain relax for a little bit.

Whenever I take a break, I always turn to music. If I am at either the ARC or the library I can put my headphones in and just zone out for a second and not have to worry about the exam I will be taking in a few hours.

If I am at home studying, I will go play guitar for a while. For me, playing guitar is my best escape; when I am playing I don’t focus on anything but the music, letting all the stresses of the day get droned out from my Marshall amplifier.

Guitar and Amp

Just the other night I learned the solo to the song “Hotel California” by the Eagles (great solo by the way for any guitarists out there). The first time I was able to play it all the way through without making any mistakes gave me a huge sense of accomplishment and satisfaction which is exactly the confidence boost everyone needs before finals week.

Playing Guitar

Don’t let finals week overshadow your passions in life, for they are exactly what your mind needs in order to relax, build confidence, and overall reduce stress. The less stressed out you are, the more successful you will most likely be on your finals. Don’t get me wrong, studying is very important, and a lot of time should be dedicated to it, but if you decide to take a break do something you enjoy doing to put your mind at ease.

Best of luck to everyone with finals this week!

Electronics and Microcontrollers

Steve Toth

Steve Toth,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 9 November 2014

No… I am not an electrical engineer. But being an Engineering Technology and Management student, I receive a good taste of electronics and programming. In the final project for my electronics and microcontrollers class, we are creating a robot that is completely autonomous. The robot will drive forward until it reaches an obstacle which is sensed by an ultrasonic sensor. At this point the robot will reverse and the ultrasonic sensor will turn left and right, using a servo, sensing for more obstructions and determine which direction to turn and continue forward.

Mini Electric Car

This project is based on an Arduino microcontroller which is a platform programmable in the C computer language. It can accept digital and analog input signals from components such as switches and sensors and then process this data to command outputs for components such as motors, servos and lights. All of this is powered by a pack of 4 AA batteries fed through a voltage regulator providing a constant 5V to feed the Arduino.

Although you could probably tell from my past blogs I am more of a mechanical than an electrical person, but I’ve really been enjoying this class and especially this project as I have been learning a lot about how many of the devices in our everyday life work that you don’t really think about.

Applying Lean Methods on Campus

Ross Lowry

Ross Lowry,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 4 November 2014

One of the classes I’m taking this semester is ETM 4320 which is Lean Enterprise Methods, its main focus being Lean Engineering. For those of you who may not be sure what Lean Engineering is, it is essentially the practice of eliminating as much waste from a production process as possible. The lecture portion of this class is already complete; however, the remainder of the semester is going to be spent working on our group project.

We are assigned to choose any business in the Athens area and implement the Lean methods that we learned in class to the business, granted that we have the business’s approval. Our group chose The Front Room coffee shop in Baker Center; other groups chose Whit’s and a local body shop.

Some of the things we may try and change include anything from the layout of their equipment, how many employees they have per shift, what role each employee is going to take, and the line used to take the customers’ orders.

Work on the project is going to begin right away as there is a lot of data we must collect on the Front Room. One of the first things we are going to study is the process to make a cup of coffee. This may seem like a very simple task, but there are a lot of components that go into making one cup of coffee. We consider the beginning of the process right when the customer places the order; the process then concludes as soon as the cup is in the customer’s hand. We will be taking a look at all of the steps in between to determine where we can cut down on time to get the product to you quicker.

Hopefully by the end of this semester we will be able to work out all of the kinks in the operations so that the customer’s experience is improved. We should even be able to save them some money, which could mean lower prices for us?!?!?

My “Brand-New” 1970 GMC K2500

Steve Toth

Steve Toth,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 30 September 2014

Besides being a college student, one of my hobbies includes restoring antique farm equipment and trucks. This past summer, although I was very busy with my full-time internship, I found time to bring a 1970 GMC K2500 pickup back to life. (I didn’t sleep.) It is 1 of about 6000 made and 1 of few that have survived 44 years of abuse.

1970 GMC K2500

My treasure came from Sisseton, South Dakota, complete with the original dealership decal and 80,000 miles. After contacting the original owner I discovered that it had spent its life as a ranch truck, hauling hogs to market and daughters to school.

After spending countless hours in the shop, all rust was repaired (while maintaining most of the original paint), a completely new suspension and steering system was installed, the complete brake system was upgraded and countless other repairs and upgrades were performed.

1970 GMC K2500

Although the truck has been a large investment of both time and money, it has also been a great source of pride and satisfaction for this engineer-in-training. It seems as though I cannot drive it anywhere without getting a smile on my face or attracting the attention of passers-by.

Battalion Commander of OU’s Army ROTC

Ross Lowry

Ross Lowry,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 28 September 2014

This Fall I have the awesome opportunity of being our school’s Army ROTC Battalion Commander, which means I am in charge of the nearly 130 Cadets who are participating in Army ROTC. ROTC stands for the Reserve Officer’s Training Corps and is the largest commissioning source of Second Lieutenants in the U.S. Army. Some of you may have even seen us this past weekend at the football game tailgating at Bicentennial Park!

As a Senior Cadet, I am involved with the planning of all of our training events. Right now, we are planning a weekend Field Training Exercise at Camp Dawson, West Virginia. Some of the events that we have planned include going through an obstacle course, conducting land navigation, and possibly an electronic simulation training which is pretty much a glorified video game, but a great training opportunity nonetheless. We also have the opportunity next month to go to the shooting range and allow our Cadets to qualify with M16 rifles.

The reason why I am enrolled in Army ROTC is due to the fact that I have always desired to serve in the U.S. Army as well as the hope of someday being a helicopter pilot. Being an ETM major and a Cadet has proven to be quite challenging, but just as rewarding as well. I have been able to establish a lot of great friendships in ROTC and within the Russ College that I know will last longer than any job or career I may have ahead of me.

Army ROTC

Benefits of My Summer Internship

Steve Toth

Steve Toth,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 3 September 2014

As a Russ College student I’m surrounded by students who had worked in engineering co-ops and internships. After hearing them talk about all the new skills they learned and the great experiences they had, I decided that I wanted to do the same thing. As fall semester came to a close, I decided I should probably start my job search. Little to my knowledge, most companies had filled their internship slots long ago, so as spring semester went on, I thought I would not get to have a real world engineering experience.

Out of the blue one day, an opening popped up that caught my attention. This opening was with Ludowici Roof Tile, located in New Lexington, OH; just a half hour from my hometown of Lancaster, OH. After a brief interview and plant tour I was offered the job. Man, I was ecstatic!

During my internship I worked full-time under the supervision of a mechanical engineer. I did not have a truly standard day. Primarily, I was tasked with designing unique solutions to improve current production machines as well as designing new machines. Additionally, I was charged with seeing that the project went from the napkin drawing, to SolidWorks (did I mention I had to learn a new modeling software!?), to the machine shop, and lastly I had to assist in the implementation of the machine. Through this process I interacted with people from a variety of backgrounds which allowed me to see both what I was designing and life as a whole in a brand new light.

My internship with Ludowici was truly a growing experience and I could not imagine my summer without it. The skills I honed by working in the real world are just the start to the benefits I gained from my internship. I feel that the relationships I built were the real prize.

Springtime for Ohio

Steven Crane

Steven Crane,
Senior, Engineering Technology and Management

Athens, OH 16 March 2014 – Good moooooooorning students!

It’s spring time for Ohio and Engineering! Even though it’s still chilly (because of this freaky winter we’ve all been experiencing) Athens, Ohio still has many activities to do. This past weekend I went for a hike at Stroud’s run, which is only 5 minutes away from campus.

Stroud's Run

With such a nice part just minutes from campus, I like to use Strouds Run as a way to unwind. After completing a 5 mile hike around the park, I felt much better! It’s week 12 in the semester and it can get frustrating at times.

It’s important to remember why it’s important to take a step back sometimes and breath; if you don’t, you just might burn out.

Stroud's Run

The semester is finally winding down and projects are starting to approach their due dates. I’m looking forward to the next time I go on a hike, because the next time I go on a hike the semester might be over.

Stroud's Run

I’m looking forward to what the summer holds in front of me. Right now I’m looking at working Gosiger for an internship, night school for the first half of the summer, and knee surgery (yay!). I’m going to be very busy this summer, but that’s the way I like it!

I hope that all have a good summer ahead of you: whether it’s working, extra-curricular practice, or just enjoying it!

Stroud's Run

Good news is…I only fell once!