Spring Co-op at Eaton Corp

Alexa Hoynacke

Alexa Hoynacke,
Senior, Industrial & Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 6 March 2017

For the spring semester I decide to co-op with Eaton Corporation. This is my second rotation with Eaton and the plan is to continue working with Eaton and complete a third rotation this summer.

For this rotation I requested to be in Ashville, North Carolina. Asheville is one of Eaton’s electrical sector plants. This plant is close to 2.2 million square feet and has around 800 employees. It is a similar environment to my first rotation. Here I am working in the medium voltage drives department, and I’m completing projects in design, supply chain, and manufacturing/operations. I have been fortunate enough to work at a large plant where I can decide my own projects and work in various departments.

I would recommend that everyone does some sort of internship, co-op, or research while at OU. Until this past summer I did not plan on doing a co-op. I had already done two years as a research intern and completed one summer internship. I felt that my resume showed a lot of experience across different fields from those experiences and involvement on campus. However, I have found that doing a co-op has taught me a lot, and I do not regret taking the semester to work.

Moving to Asheville was a completely new experience. I have never lived outside of Ohio so the move was exciting and a culture change. When doing a co-op, everything is fast-paced: finding an apartment quickly, meeting new coworkers and friends, and exploring the new area in just 4 months.

While in Asheville I have been able to meet other interns and connect with fellow Bobcats that relocated here. I live in the Blue Ridge Mountains, near the Smoky Mountains, and along the Appalachian trail. The picture below was taken on one of the 6,000 footers that are along the Appalachian Trail.

Appalachian Trail

My biggest take-away from doing internships is that it’s not about how much you know before, but if you know how to learn. You may not use every formula you study in your classes, but you learn how to learn and problem solve.

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