Category Archives: Electrical Engineering

Hearing from Experts in Industry

Andrew Videmsek

Andrew Videmsek,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 24 November 2016

As a student in engineering, I feel it is sometimes hard to see how everything we are learning is applied to the world around us. Luckily there are always plenty of opportunities to hear talks from experts in industry and research about how engineers are moving the world forward.

Just last week, the local chapter of IEEE hosted Jim Watson, an IEEE National Speaker, for a talk at their weekly meeting. Jim gave insight on what an engineering degree allows you to do after graduation, and what you can do during school to better prepare yourself for the future. In addition, he touched on the ways we as students can transition the skills we have learned in a university setting to challenges we will face on the job site.

Another talk I got the opportunity to attend recently was by Dr. Zak M. Kassas from the University of California, Riverside. Dr. Kassas runs the ASPIN Lab (Autonomous Systems Perception, Intelligence, & Navigation Laboratory) and focuses his research on collaborative and opportunistic navigation and optimal information gathering in stochastic environments. His talk went into great detail about his research in ways to complement, or completely replace, GPS biased navigation with the radio waves that are constantly being projected in the world around us.

The final of the talks I heard in November was by Dr. Arvind Thiruvengadam, a research assistant professor at West Virginia University. Dr. Thiruvengadam is probably best known for being one of the researchers who broke the recent news about the Volkswagen emissions tests. In his talk, Dr. Thiruvengadam went into depth about the research areas and future engine technologies that could lead to lower emissions and higher operating efficiencies.

Family Halloween Tradition

Mia Wilson

Mia Wilson,
Junior, Electrical Engineeering

Athens, OH 27 October 2016

Well, it seems like the month of October has zoomed past me and now it’s the weekend of Halloween! All of the leaves, costume parties, and cooler weather combine to make October one of my favorite months of the year. One thing I really like about the end of October is the thought that I have made it more than halfway through the semester already.

A tradition that I have with my family is our trip to Halloweekends at King’s Island. We usually go the weekend of Halloween and go through all of the scary haunted mazes and houses they have set up throughout the amusement park. This weekend we are going up on Saturday. And to add to all the fun, we are staying at Great Wolf Lodge, known for its indoor waterpark! So, when I am not riding roller coasters and having my butt scared off, I’m going to be slipping and sliding through the waterpark.

A perk about going up on a Saturday and staying through Sunday on the last weekend they are open, is that no one is there the Sunday! That means shorter lines and even more rides. So my plan is to go to all of the haunted houses Saturday night and ride the rides until they close on Sunday!

I am really excited to get to spend some quality time with my family this weekend and have a fun and safe Halloween at King’s Island!

Rocket Design and Engineering Team

Andrew Videmsek

Andrew Videmsek,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 15 October 2016

With classes now in full swing and midterms coming to an end, it’s always nice to take a small break from school and relax. One of the best ways for me to relax while still working on engineering projects is through the student organizations I am a part of.

Last weekend I and four other members of the Rocket Design and Engineering Team took the hour long drive down to Gallipolis, Ohio, to launch our level one and level two certification rockets. The rockets we launched went to a projected height of 3,800 feet and were designed to prove we have the knowledge to safely construct, launch, and retrieve high powered rockets.

Rocket Launch

While we were there we got the opportunity to do so much more than just launch rockets. We experienced firsthand what it was like to make last minute modifications due to weather conditions, got to work with and talk to experts in the industry, and even had a friendly competition with another engineering college.

With that being said it wasn’t all fun and games: we saw what happens when a rocket burns up on the pad due to a failed motor, and had to retrieve a rocket from a tree when its parachute got stuck on its return to earth.

Additionally, just this weekend was another major event for a student organization I am involved in. Our chapter of IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu, the Electrical and Computer Engineering Honors Society, held its induction for new members. Our school chapter, the Delta Epsilon chapter, dates back to 1960, and this induction ceremony added 8 new members to the long history. In addition, this induction marks my first official day as president of the chapter for the 2016-2017 school year.

Retail’s Digital Summit

Mia Wilson

Mia Wilson,
Junior, Electrical Engineeering

Athens, OH 27 September 2016

This past weekend I attended Shop.org Retail’s Digital Summit in Dallas, Texas. They flew a few Ohio University students down there for free. The only thing I had to pay for was a ride to and from the airport, a lunch and a dinner.

I was informed about the event by our secretary here in the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. I saw “free” written everywhere, and so I figured I would apply. After a day they emailed me and told me I had been accepted to go to the conference.

One important aspect of the trip was being able to network with large retail companies like GSN, Ebay, and PayPal. They attend this conference looking to network and team up with other companies to brainstorm new ideas for selling their products. They also were hoping to show off their recent marketing schemes.

One thing that I did learn was how to communicate on a professional level with people that aren’t just strictly engineering. I got to meet some students from other schools. I also got to meet some students from Ohio University’s Russ College who I hadn’t known before this event. I also learned that although the marketing industry treats their members very nicely, I don’t think it’s a field that interests me.

While I was in Dallas, I was able to do some sight-seeing and enjoy some good food. I got to see where John F Kennedy was shot with the help of an unofficial tour guide. He pulled us out into the street to get a picture near the “X” of his assassination. The skyline was beautiful and so was our hotel. I tried one of the best steaks I’ve ever had, with some amazing peach cobbler. We got delicious free food at the conference events. Although we tried to diversify our taste buds, to save some money we stopped by a Subway to get an Italian BMT.

Engineering and Video Production

Joe Meyer

Joe Meyer,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 11 September 2016

When I was in my senior year of high school, they offered a class on video production where I was able to learn about every part that went into a news broadcast. I was able to dive into the audio, camera work and the post production. We also did smaller projects such as making a music video, and shooting news packages. After learning all of this, I realized I loved the work I was doing.

Over the summer I worked a co-op at Rovisys in Aurora Ohio, and I started to find ways I could incorporate my appreciation of video production with engineering. I was able to work with senior engineers in different industries to make short productions about what their strengths were and what technologies they used. This gave the customers an in-depth viewpoint to what Rovisys could do and how it would be done.

At Ohio University, they recently partnered with ESPN3 to have a student production crew shoot all of the Football, Basketball, and Volleyball games. When I found out about the class in the summer, I knew I had to register for it. After meeting a couple times with the class so far, its been amazing to see all of the new equipment, production trailer, and funding they have put into it.

My future aspirations are to find ways to incorporate what I’ve learned from electrical engineering here at Ohio University, and incorporate that with videography.

Summer Co-op at Honda

Andrew Videmsek

Andrew Videmsek,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 31 August 2016

Over the summer, I had the opportunity to co-op with Honda North America at their Marysville, Ohio campus. I worked in a subdivision of their engineering center focused on replicating manufacturing processes for training purposes and for testing new technologies.

With this being my first co-op, I was nervous not knowing if I would be able to complete the tasks they had assigned for me. Within my first few days I quickly realized I had nothing to worry about. The projects assigned to me were most definitely a challenge, and required me to learn about systems that I had never seen before, but my mentor knew that, and provided me with every resource I needed to be successful.

The majority of my projects were related to developing equipment to accurately simulate different factory environments. I was tasked with the design, construction, programming, and implementation of this equipment. While doing this I got to work with people from many different backgrounds, all who helped me grow my skill-set. Additionally, I was working with equipment and software that are normally not taught in a school environment.

Now that I am back at Ohio University, I feel very fortunate I got the opportunity that I did. I was able to take the knowledge I learned in school, and apply that to real-world problems. There wasn’t a single day I didn’t learn something new, and I feel this co-op has put me in a better position moving forward into my engineering career.

How OU has Changed Me

Ali McCormick

Ali McCormick,
Senior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 27 April 2016

With graduation only days away, I’ve had the opportunity to reflect on how the last four years I’ve spent at Ohio University have affected me as a person.

Coming into Ohio University, I was very timid and soft-spoken. I had a difficult time putting myself out there because I generally kept to myself. I remember taking an introduction to ethics course and the final for the class being to present your beliefs on ethics to the class. (I actually had considered dropping the class, that’s how badly I disliked speaking in front of people.)

Back then, presenting in front of a classroom was the end of the world for me. Not only because of my anxiety of public speaking, but also due to my belief that what I had to say didn’t always seem that important.

The following years I spent at Ohio University changed my opinion on personal voice and, also my life, for the better. I went on to join Theta Tau, the professional engineering fraternity on campus. Through this, I gained friendships that I know will last me a lifetime.

I focused heavily on putting myself into situations that were out of my comfort zone, which gave me the opportunity to grow as an individual. I made sure to put everything I had into my studies, which lead me to obtain a Co-Op at L-3 Communications in Cincinnati, Ohio. I took the experience from there and brought it back to school with me, and applied it to classes.

But, the most important aspect of my college career comes from the opportunity of participating in Engineering Ambassadors. I was nominated for the position at the end of my sophomore year and performed the duties during my junior and senior years.

The position requires strong speaking skills, which as I discussed earlier weren’t as developed back then. I remember that during my interview for the position, I expressed that while my speaking skills may not be as impressive as the fellow applicants, my overall passion to better those skills was immeasurable.

The opportunity to speak with prospective students and parents strengthened my interpersonal skills in unimaginable ways and just the ability to lead students into a direction that will ensure success is extraordinary.

My voice was given purpose and pushed me to pursue opportunities that otherwise would have been unobtainable, and for that I can thank Ohio University.