Category Archives: Engineering Technology and Managment

Spring Co-op at Toyota

Andrew Noll

Andrew Noll,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 18 February 2018

Starting out the year 2018 I accepted a co-op with Toyota Manufacturing in Buffalo, West Virginia. I have an apartment in Eleanor, WV, the neighboring town of Buffalo, and live with another co-op.

I am very grateful for the classes and professors here at OU that have set me up to secure this opportunity. I got an interview with Toyota through the Russ College career fair last fall and learned a lot about the company through a friend who worked in Buffalo last summer.

My position at Toyota is internal logistics engineer and I have been doing lead time studies for the engine and transmission lines. I map out the process lines and analyze them in attempts to eliminate buffer stock, which in turn reduces inventory costs.

At the end of my rotation I will have to present out to various managers on what changes I propose to implement. The work environment at Toyota is great and I am learning a lot of manufacturing precedents that the Japanese company has set. I have no doubt that this experience will be very valuable in my career search, and I am hopeful that it will turn into a full time offer after graduation!

Racquetball

Brandon Mahr

Brandon Mahr,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 8 February 2018

The weather has been absolutely brutal this winter, but thankfully, it’s still toasty 72 degrees in the Ping Center, so I can’t complain too much.

One of my favorite things to do when it’s nasty outside is to head to the Ping Recreation Center, where I can play one of my favorite sports, racquetball. Not only is racquetball a great way to get your “spring break bod”, it’s also a great way to engage in a little friendly competition.

If you haven’t played racquetball before, it’s basically tennis, but it’s indoors and you play without a net. The goal is to get the ball to hit the floor twice before your opponent can hit it off the “back” wall, and it is a blast. I had never played it before coming to college, but after trying with a buddy one night, I was hooked.

It’s a great game to play for several reasons, but one of the biggest reasons it’s great is it only takes two people to play. When everyone is busy and you can’t get a team together to play basketball, football, etc., you and a single friend can head to Ping and get a quick game in.

There are a ton of other things to do in the Ping Center, but racquetball has to be my favorite. So when it’s cold outside and you feel like you have nothing else to do, or you want to get a quick workout in, head to the Ping Center and play some racquetball, you won’t regret it.

The Great Outdoors

Andrew Noll

Andrew Noll,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 8 December 2017

My entire life, I have been quite the outdoorsman. I attribute some of that to my parents who took us camping twice a year with several close families.

In addition to that, I used to go “creeking” and catch all sorts of animals. I would keep these animals and study them for a few days, feeding and caring to them as needed, then I would release them back into the wild.

I was very close to entering a major in bio or even environmental engineering. I do not regret my decision to chose engineering technology. However, in the future I could see myself getting into an industry that can work with or protect the environment.

As I’ve grown older I’ve moved onto different kinds of outdoor hobbies. I started fishing religiously, hunting, cliff diving, backpacking with my pup or even doing “man vs. wild” with my friend.

The two things that made me appreciate nature the most were hunting, and the man vs. wild camps where we went out for 3 days with just a pot, a bb gun, and two knives.

Now a lot of people ask how I could hunt animals yet love nature? Everyone has an opinion and I respect that. I am not here to argue why I believe hunting is okay, but I truly believe it has made me more in tune with nature and helped me understand its complicated beauty.

I might sit outside and freeze all day without seeing one deer, but I get an opportunity to study nature that non-hunters cannot experience. I learn about varieties of plants and animals. I understand weather patterns and how animals react to it. I see the delicate balance of the ecosystem, and the interaction between animals at its simplest level, in which no book can teach.

For example, something I see too often: chipmunks will chirp loudly and scatter into holes, then 10 seconds later a hawk will fly by. It is that sort of communication and realization of nature’s community that has made me enjoy hunting so much.

Whether I am hunting, cliff diving, hiking, camping, etc. nature has never failed to amaze me. At every turn, I will educate people on its importance advocate for its sustainability for future generations.

Here’s a short video I made about my love for nature and the outdoors.

Eco-Challenge: Residence Hall Heating

Brandon Mahr

Brandon Mahr,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 28 November 2017

If you’re looking for a challenge outside of your normal homework and projects, you won’t have to look far at Ohio University. Feeling a little bold earlier this semester and looking to improve my problem solving skills, I engaged in Ohio University’s Eco-Challenge, and it was an awesome experience.

The Ohio University Eco-Challenge is a competition that involves students from the Russ College Robe Leadership Institute, students from the College of Business’s Select Scholars, and the Cutler Scholars organization. Students from each of the organizations are mixed and put into teams, where they then
are tasked with developing a sustainable concept supported by a savings analysis.

My team got to work in early September developing a concept to improve Ohio University’s sustainability efforts. The concept we came up with was implementing occupancy-sensing thermostats in Ohio University’s dorms, so that when students left their dorm rooms, the AC/Heating would automatically kick-off, thus eliminating AC/Heating energy waste.

Then the real work began. Not only did we have to come up with the concept, we had to prove that it would save Ohio University money.

Thankfully, Dan Squiller, an alumnus of Ohio University and CEO of Aquam Corporation in California, was there to guide us along the way. With the support of Dan and other professors, my team was able to develop a feasible implementation strategy that could save Ohio University almost $40,000
dollars a year if implemented in Bromley Hall!

Unfortunately, our concept proposal did not win, but OU facilities is still looking into implementing our concept.

The experience was awesome, and I can’t thank Dan Squiller and Ohio University enough for providing me the opportunity to solve a real world problem and engage in problem solving with a cross-functional team.

Networking Through the Sales Centre

Andrew Noll

Andrew Noll,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 1 November 2017

I was recently inducted into the Ralph and Luci Schey Sales Centre here on campus. Schey is the #1 sales center in the country and has 100% job placement after graduation.

A lot of people ask why an engineer would join a sales center and what kind of benefits they would realistically get? Well to answer that, Schey is one of the best networking platforms I’ve been a part of. Furthermore, I have always had a bit of interest in technical sales, and Schey has over 50 corporate sponsors, including many technical sales companies.

I went to the Schey career fair and I thought I wouldn’t be there long because I only wanted to hit the tech sales booths. While walking around, I saw a few manufacturing companies, and even though they were hiring for sales, I told them about my manufacturing experience and showed interest. I was pleasantly surprised when I walked out of that career fair with two manufacturing engineer interviews, and a phone screening with Dell EMC.

The point I want to get at is that networking is such a huge part of one’s career. Obviously, classwork and involvement is important but I do agree with the statement “it’s all about who you know”. Everyday you get out of bed and go about your business, you are networking.

The motivated individuals in a group like Schey that you surround yourself with, the countless connections on LinkedIn and your willingness to reach out to them, the guy or gal sitting next to you at the barber shop, even your barber can be valuable connections! Networking comes from a wide variety of sources and I always try to expose myself to many situations and experiences because I know it will pay off.

I have always been a natural extrovert. In regards to my education, people are my favorite subject. I say that people are my passion because I know I can learn a lot about myself, what I want in a career and plenty of other valuable knowledge from others. Taking the extra steps to meet people and learn about other industries has allowed me a sense of stability in my job search and I plan to keep up the solid networking in the upcoming years.

Robotics Club

Brandon Mahr

Brandon Mahr,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 8 October 2017

I love my engineering classes, and I have learned a lot from them, but one of the best ways to cement what you have learned in class is to apply what you’ve learned in a student organization.

One student organization I am in is the Robotics Club, which is a new Russ College organization that focuses on developing and creating, you guessed it, robots.

As a club, one of our first projects is to create a robot to enter into the Association for Technology,Management, and Applied Engineering (ATMAE) Robotics Competition. At the completion, we will have to put our robot through several tests, including throwing a bean bag into a corn hole, lifting up a weight and grabbing an item underneath it, and removing an object from inside a tiny pipe.

In order to make the robot perform these functions, we have to make the robot, from scratch. I have taken several classes geared towards robotics, including a C# Coding class, an Electronics/Microcontrollers class, and a couple of others, but this is my first chance to truly apply what I have learned about robotics in class into a project.

I have learned and incredible amount of information about robotics from engaging in activities with this club, and is has really helped cement what I learned in class.

Not only has the Robotics Club helped me get involved in something I’m passionate about and helped me learn, but it has also helped me professionally. Employers love to see students who are active in clubs and students who have been involved in activities where they have had to solve problems. You can’t really go wrong with getting involved in an Engineering organization, and I know getting involved with the Robotics Club this fall has certainly helped me.

A Summer Abroad

Brandon Mahr

Brandon Mahr,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 6 September 2017

This past summer, thanks to the Cutler Scholars Program here at Ohio University, I was able to study abroad in Sorrento, Italy for 5 weeks. In Italy, I studied a Business/Sustainability course in order to fulfill a requirement for my minor.

My experience in Italy was absolutely amazing, and I would advise any college student to at least consider studying abroad. For engineering students, it’s often difficult to find a program that caters to your major and needs, but Ohio University’s Office of Global Opportunities (OGO) is absolutely amazing and offers an extremely wide variety of programs/courses. From working with a manufacturing company in China, to applying engineering solutions in Ghana’s impoverished areas, to studying fine arts in Great Britain, and everything in between, OGO has it.

When you are studying or volunteering abroad, not only do you have to the opportunity to grow and learn in the classroom, but you also can grow as a person. I learned a lot about business and sustainability this summer, but I learned even more about myself.

Italy

I became a more confident and adventurous person, and I did a lot of things that I may have never done before, like cliff diving off a Roman Villa into the Mediterranean, or swimming a couple of miles to visit several underwater sea caves, or engaging with complete strangers in deeply personal discussions. I really challenged myself this summer when I was in Italy, and grew a lot from it. Study abroad this summer certainly changed my life, and I would advise anyone interested in studying abroad to do it, and you definitely won’t regret it.