Category Archives: Engineering Technology and Managment

Fall Co-op at Toyota

Brandon Mahr

Brandon Mahr,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 11 January 2017

This past fall, I was privileged to be a Production Engineering Co-op for Toyota at their Motor Manufacturing Plant in Buffalo, West Virginia (TMMWV). Over winter break Toyota offered me to stay and finish up a few of my projects, and I took the offer. My co-op experience was wonderful, and it was amazing to take what I learned in classes and actually apply it in a work setting.

So, while most of my friends were sleeping in and enjoying a much needed break, I was working. But, I couldn’t have been happier with my decision, though admittedly I definitely missed the sleeping in part.

I was fortunate enough to be given a large amount of responsibility and work some really cool projects in my time at TMMWV. My main goal was to assist in the implementation of Toyota’s New Global Architecture (TNGA), which was in the form of a more efficient, greener Engine Assembly Line. During my term I designed and implemented several new jigs/devices that helped improve TNGA’s line efficiency and improve line safety.

One really cool project I worked over Winter Break was programming all of TNGA’s Automatically Guided Carts. The Automatic Carts transfer Engine Blocks from one area to another, and I was in charge of deciding and programming the carts’ paths. I then designed a new way to ensure no engine blocks fell or were damaged when being transferred, which is now Patent Pending.

Deciding to take the Fall Semester off and co-op somewhere was definitely nerve-wracking, but it ended up benefiting me in a thousand different ways. It helped me see the value in my ETM degree, and I learned a lot that will benefit me in my future coursework. And although I enjoy waking up at 11 AM as much as the next guy, I am glad I went the extra mile and worked over my Winter Break.

Epsilon Pi Tau Inductions

Jacob Motts

Jacob Motts,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 16 November 2016

Epsilon Pi Tau is the honor society within Engineering Technology and Management. Because it is an honor society, students do not apply to join the organization. Instead, students are chosen for admission based on several strict criteria within EPT. As the weeks passed this semester, I knew that meant that new members were about to be added to our group.

I was appointed to be Vice President of Epsilon Pi Tau last spring and I could not have been more honored. However, since I was an officer, that also meant that I was part of the honorary that led the induction event. When we all got our 15 page script for the event, it became quite clear that some practice was going to be needed.

See, for anyone who has not been to an honor fraternity induction, there is almost always a script from the national organization to be followed in order to keep events consistent and formal. This is great and all, but, the other side of that is that the script is filled with both academically challenging English as well as Greek vocabulary. Furthermore, since this is the first impression new members had of both the officers and the organization as a whole.

On the big night we all were a little unsure if our practice had been enough. It wasn’t so much about getting the script right, rather, it was mostly about leaving the right first impression on the new members. We may have had to improvise in a couple places and flubbed a few words, but at the end of the day, the ceremony was a success and all the new members were overwhelmingly positive about the night. Of course, maybe that was just the Bob Evans talking.

HallOUween 2016

Jacob Motts

Jacob Motts,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 31 October 2016

Every year when October rolls around there is always talk of the parties, music, and craziness of the block party held in Athens for Halloween. What is talked about much less are the amazing costumes and fantastic interactions between the participants that grace the bricks of Court Street on HallOUween.

After HallOUween 2015, I decided I was going to be the god of mischief himself, Loki. Over the course of a year I worked on my costume whenever I had available time. Being an engineering student, that time was few and far between, but was able to wrap things up the weekend before the block party.

Halloween 2016

My girlfriend, who was just as excited as I was to show off her costume, was accompanying me as Captain America. At that point, my only hope was that there would be a good reception of us on Court Street.

To my great pleasure, there was, and it surpassed my expectations. Almost immediately we ran into a Thor costume and had to take a picture. This continued as all sorts of Marvel characters wanted to snap a picture with us. At one point, we were even stopped by a reporter from The Athens News for a picture of us to be added to the online gallery from the event.

At the end of the night, I could not help but reflect on the amazing interactions and costumes I had experienced. I’ve always loved costumes, and HallOUween delivered yet again. Now all that is left is to figure out what costume to make next.

Setting up a New ETM Lab

Jacob Motts

Jacob Motts,
Senior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 3 September 2016

This last summer I had the great pleasure of working in the Engineering Technology and Management labs under Ron Porter. It was a wonderful experience that allowed me to see the laboratories within Stocker Center, the main building of the Russ College, with a whole new level of appreciation.

Primarily, the job entailed maintenance and cleanup of the existing labs. I still remember the first project we had was blowing out and cleaning up the immense amount of sawdust that had accumulated in lab 009. This is the woodworking lab for ETM, and I was truly not prepared for how much sawdust I experienced in that first week and a half.

As the weeks went on through the summer, we also were tasked with some jobs needed to prepare the road for the new ETM capstone lab. Some of the back rooms were just a treasure of really interesting old projects and equipment. It surprised me to find some of the processes and equipment have remained relatively unchanged after so many years. Just as interesting were the discoveries so obsolete that we had trouble even figuring out what they were.

I find myself much more aware in the lab sessions of my classes. When work is finished I am so much more motivated to make sure not only my area is cleaned, but the whole lab that was being used. Largely, it was because I was able to see behind the curtain and witness the amount of work put into our wonderful university. At the end of the day, it was a very eye-opening experience that left me much more invested in my classes and Ohio University as a whole.

Getting Ready to Leave

Steve Toth

Steve Toth,
Senior, Engineering Technology and Management

Athens, OH 22 April 2016

Today was my last day of class as college student, meaning a week from tomorrow I will be walking across the floor of the Convocation Center as I graduate from Ohio University. This experience is kind of a bittersweet one, one that I’ve never really had before.

Soon I will be starting a new chapter in my life’s book. One not centered around waiting on classes to start or end. It’s both exciting and scary as I will be coming into a whole new batch of variables.

The first few pages of this chapter will be finding an apartment for my fiancée and I while we remodel the farm house. Shortly thereafter, I will be starting my “big-boy job” at Honda.

With all of these huge changes coming in a very short period of time, I’m sure things will be hectic but I know that my experiences here at Ohio University will be some of my most cherished memories and that the Russ College has prepared me for life after college. For the last time, this is Steve Toth signing off. Stay classy, Bobcats.

One Month to Go

Chris Delwiche

Chris Delwiche,
Senior, Engineering Technology and Management

Athens, OH 27 March 2016
In August it was “one more year” now at the end of March its “one more month”. I never expected college to go by this quickly. Ever since pre-school, it’s been the familiar cycle of school, summer, school, etc. But not this time. This time I will finally be entering the working world as my formal education comes to a close.

College went by as quickly as everyone told me it would. My freshman year and days of living in the dorms are now nostalgic memories, campus has changed geographically since I first got here in 2011 with the addition of new dorms and sports facilities. Boyd Dining Hall has gone from the place you ate because you were desperate and lived on West Green to the most impressive dining hall on campus.

Everything I was told to expect was true. You will meet some of your best friends, you will learn more in these 4 (or more) years of your life than ever before, you will learn about yourself, and you will work harder than you have before.

My advice to any nervous incoming freshman would be to try and relax as much as possible. You will make those new friends, you will figure out what you need to do to succeed, you will make your own memories, and you will leave here a better person than you came here as. But for you and me, take a minute every now and then to appreciate the position you’re in. Because your college years are the quickest years of your life ;).

ETM Capstone Design Production Project

Steve Toth

Steve Toth,
Senior, Engineering Technology and Management

Athens, OH 20 March 2016

One special thing about the Russ College is that every major completes its own capstone course. For Engineering Technology and Management majors, that means designing and completing a production run like what would be found in a factory.

If you are not familiar with Engineering Technology and Management (ETM) we focus on everything in the manufacturing process from product design, process design, process improvement, process management, quality control all the way to technical sales. Our capstone course incorporates all of these into one intense semester.

We start out by designing a product. For my group this is a door side organizer which incorporates a shelf, a cubby, key hooks and a cast aluminum badge which I’ve mentioned in a previous blog post.

Organizer

After the product has been designed and then proven by a model build, the rest of the semester focuses on bringing it into production through the creation of tooling and the multiple control plans that dictate a process (quality, inventory, capacity, routing sheets, etc.).

At the end of the semester, all of these components are put into action in a production run with 15 finished products being produced in a five-hour period…followed by a three-day nap.