Travel Opportunities

Emily Morello

Emily Morello,
Junior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 13 November 2016

One passion that I have always had is traveling. Ever since I was little, my family has always loved going on vacations to interesting places. My family is from Warren which is a smaller city located in northeast Ohio. There really is not much to do in this area, so any chance we get, we like to go places.

My mom’s side of the family is from Quintana, Spain. Some of my Spanish family lives in Ft. Lauderdale so we go there quite a bit to vacation. I always loved listening to their stories about living in Spain; it made me want to visit the country very badly.

One summer, however, my mom decided to switch up our usual Ft. Lauderdale visit. She is a Spanish teacher at the high school I used to attend and she organized a school trip to Europe for all of the students. When she told our family this news, we were extremely excited.

During this trip, we traveled to Spain and Italy, specifically Madrid, Barcelona, Rome, Capri, and Pompeii. I was fifteen at the time and will never forget the amazing experience I had that summer.

Now that I am twenty-one and in college, all I want to do is go back to Europe to travel more. I recently applied for a study abroad program to visit Greece in May. It is called the Global Consulting Program, which even includes an internship opportunity. I am supposed to find out if I was selected for the program sometime before Thanksgiving break. Hopefully it works out!

Meet the Ambassadors Event

Kevin White

Kevin White,
Senior, Industrial & Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 11 November 2016

On Wednesday, November 9th, the Russ College Engineering Ambassadors hosted a “Meet the Ambassadors” event. The goal of this event was to receive feedback and concerns from the current students for different things around the Russ College such as facilities, courses, and extracurricular organizations. The students gave their feedback by writing the feedback on a Post-It note and putting it on the white board in the room.

Pizza and beverages were provided at the event in exchange for the feedback. This was a great and unique way for the ambassadors to find out about some issues around the Russ College from different students’ perspectives in all majors. This was also a great opportunity to explain to students who the Ambassadors are and what we do.

Meet the Ambassadors

Another added benefit to this event was that the Ambassadors now have great feedback to relay to Dean Irwin when we have lunch with him. Usually the feedback we give come from the Ambassadors’ perspectives but now we have suggestions from a lot of different students. Improving the Russ College experience for students is very important to the Ambassadors and this event was one step forward by receiving input from many students.

Chili Cook-Off

Becca Sedlak

Becca Sedlak,
Junior, Aviation Flight

Athens, OH 11 November 2016

For three years now, every Dad’s Weekend my dad and I go to OU’s Women in Aviation annual Chili Cook-off. My Freshman and Sophomore year, my mom would make a pineapple chili and my dad would bring it down and we would enter it in the non-traditional category. This year I have my own apartment, so my dad and I made the pineapple chili. To be honest we just threw everything in the crockpot then looked at the recipe that we didn’t even follow.

Throughout the night the chili cooked and we went and entered it into the cook-off on Saturday. Since, we have made this chili for two years and never won I didn’t think that we actually would win this year too.

Chili Cook-Off Prize

When the results came back, the pineapple chili I made with my dad won first place for the non-traditional chili category. I couldn’t believe it–for the past two years, this chili was never close to winning and when we don’t follow the recipe it won. Now my dad and I hold something over my mom: the fact the year we made the chili and we won. I think that was the best the highlight of the weekend besides my dad coming down to visit.

Globalization and the Developing World

Jane Oberhauser

Jane Oberhauser,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 9 November 2016

This semester, I am taking a non-engineering class called “Globalization and the Developing World”. (GEOG 1310) The class was recommended to me by a friend because of the passionate and knowledgeable professor and interesting content.

It’s a class taught by the geography department, and it’s similar to a human geography class I took my sophomore year. As the name suggests, this class looks at the effects of globalization on the developing parts of the world. This is especially interesting to me as an engineer who would love to “Create for Good” somewhere in a developing part of the world.

This class has been interesting and challenging. It’s not challenging in the way that my conceptually difficult classes are, but it forces my eyes open to the incredibly awful things that happen in the world. We had a section on child labor, where we learned that children are often paid incredibly small amounts for working day in and day out in unhealthy working positions and conditions.

We are currently learning about the unrest in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This poses an interesting moral conflict, where all of electronics that we are using and designing as engineers contain a mineral that almost solely comes from this area. The mineral is fought for and genocidal wars are waged because of it. This all goes back to globalization when we realize that everything here is so interconnected. How can I currently be typing on a computer that is full of this mineral that caused so many unfair deaths? How should I feel about this? It makes me feel sick, but what am I to do?

These things, and many more injustices in the world, make my soul crave for justice to come. When or how that will happen isn’t in my hands, but I do want to do whatever I can to help. In my everyday life, I can buy products that are certified fairly traded. In my engineering future, what if I could design an inexpensive rug weaving loom that allowed children to sit in ways that don’t deform their growing bodies? Those are just small examples, but I’m thankful for this class opening up my eyes.

SWE Conference

Caroline Wilson

Caroline Wilson,
Senior, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Athens, OH 6 November 2016

From October 26th to 29th, I had the privilege of attending WE16, the national conference for the Society of Women Engineers in Philadelphia, PA. We drove two vans to Philadelphia on Wednesday morning, and left early Saturday.

I had been to a SWE conference before—the regional conference in Cincinnati last spring—but this was a whole new ballgame. WE16 advertises itself as being the world’s largest conference and career fair for women in engineering and technology. It did not disappoint.

At the regional conference last spring, there were sessions to go to about LinkedIn, interviewing, and a few other topics. They were definitely interesting, but the sheer quantity of sessions at the national conference could not even be compared. There were sessions about anything you could possibly want to learn: in one day, I attended a panel about working while raising a family, a talk about presenting research as women in science; a presentation about advocating for diversity; and a session about unconscious bias.

The SWE conference is the kind of event that young women entering engineering dream of: thousands of poised, accomplished, determined women all gather in one place to celebrate each other’s accomplishments and help other women reach the same heights.

On the second day of the conference, I tried my hand at the SWE career fair. The breadth of companies which were represented was impressive—everyone from Google to Honeywell to Merck was in attendance. I was actually selected for interviews by two companies that morning: IBA Proton Therapy and Boston Scientific. Both went really well, and I was so grateful to have been able to speak with companies from the biomedical engineering field.

After the interviews, I had the opportunity to present my research in the WE16 Rapid Fire Undergraduate event. The title of my presentation was, “Novel Small Molecule Inhibitors of Inflammation Prevent Saturated Free Fatty Acid-Induced Inflammation Associated with Nonalcoholic Fatty Liver Disease in Human Hepatocytes.”

This particular event was unique because some of the presentations were based on research projects, and some were based on internship experiences. I liked the breadth of topics that were addressed because of this set up: young women presented about everything from Harley Davidson motorcycles to weather patterns across the United States and their impact on heating and cooling bills.

I was so honored to represent my university, and in particular the Russ College of Engineering and Technology, at a national level. The entire national conference was the most amazing experience, and I know that experiences like it can completely change careers for the young women (and men) who are lucky enough to attend it.

Theta Tau: Professional Engineering Fraternity

Quintin Fettes

Quintin Fettes,
Senior, Computer Science

Athens, OH 6 November 2016

My tie was 3 inches too short, I noticed as I looked down to re-button my shirt. I rushed into the front of the room and sat down with 3 other candidates for our group interview for Theta Tau: The Co-ed Professional Engineering fraternity. That was nearly 2 years ago, and today my continued involvement with the group has impacted my undergraduate career more than I ever could’ve hoped.

This semester, I’m serving my last term as an executive member of Theta Tau; as a result, the nostalgia of my journey with my fellow engineers has set in.

From day 1, I knew that I had joined a special group. I wasn’t suffering over long homework assignments alone in my dorm anymore, I was suffering with my friends. I wasn’t wasting all of my free time, sitting around and complaining of boredom, I was organizing and participating in community service, fundraisers, professional development, and social events. The whole time, I was making lifelong friends.

Theta Tau

As my love for the group grew, I chose to help by taking leadership positions. Believe me, there is no group more difficult to lead than your friends. None of them will be afraid to tell you that the idea you pitched was terrible; on the other hand, no group will ever be more enthusiastic, and willing to take risks on good ideas.

Considering every triumph and every headache of leadership, if I could go back I wouldn’t change a single thing; the experience was priceless. It was in this group that I began to realize the rewards of being involved, and improving myself within student organizations on campus. Any Engineer looking for a home on campus would benefit by checking Theta Tau first.

Fall Motorcycle Rides

Rob Parker

Rob Parker,
Senior, Civil Engineering

Athens, OH 4 November 2016

Fall is by far my favorite season of the year. The temperature is cooler in the morning and during the day it usually warms to the low 60s. Along with the very comfortable temperature of the outside air, the trees change to beautiful colors. With all that said, there is nothing that clears my mind and gives me a better break from school than motorcycle rides with some of my friends.

There are countless winding roads and destinations outside of the city limits to choose from. One of my favorite rides is to Lake Hope, which is about 17 miles from Athens. The scenery on the way is breath taking. I usually ride with some of my friends that also have motorcycles and I take whoever wants to ride on my back seat as well.

ALT

Discovering what awaits outside of the city limits is quite an experience. There are some rather cool landscapes around the Athens area and I’m sure every student’s experience is different. Having the wind hit my face with my buddies riding next to me cruising by the colorful trees is the best stress reliever that I have found yet.