Tag Archives: conferences

Society of Women Engineers Conference

Caroline wilson

Caroline Wilson,
Junior, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Athens, OH 7 February 2016

This weekend I had the privilege of attending the Region G Conference for the Society of Women Engineers at the University of Cincinnati. It was a weekend full of seminars, networking, and bonding with a group of amazing ladies.

SWE Conference

I joined SWE at the end of last semester—-pretty late in the game, considering I will be graduating next spring, but I am so glad that I finally took the plunge. This conference was the perfect way to kick start my involvement and passion for SWE, an organization which I am certain will remain a part of my life for many years to come.

SWE Conference

At my first SWE chapter meeting, we were asked to submit a statement on the prompt, “What SWE Means to Me.” I felt uncomfortable then because I hadn’t had any real experiences with the group, so the question bounced around, unanswered, in my head.

After this weekend, though, I am confident that I have an answer: for me, SWE is about empowering the women around me—-it is a platform from which we can shout our accomplishments and be recognized and celebrated for succeeding as a woman in a male-dominated field. It’s about telling little girls that yes, they too can become engineers, that they can see a problem in the world around them and imagine creative solutions to fix it. It’s not just for a select group of college women; it’s for women in the peak of their careers, girls in middle and high school that are discovering their passions, men who are supportive of women in engineering.

This weekend I attended seminars teaching me about LinkedIn and interviewing; had a professional headshot taken; asked questions about graduate school to women who were experiencing it; and had the opportunity to attend a career fair. For someone who was completely new to the organization, I realized very quickly exactly what SWE brings to the lives of thousands of women across the world, and I feel incredibly proud to be a part of it.

Tau Beta Pi National Convention

Leigh Ann Tumblin

Leigh Ann Tumblin,
Senior, Chemical and Biomolecular engineering

Athens, OH 4 November 2015

Last week, I was able to attend the Tau Beta Pi Convention in Providence, Rhode Island. Tau Beta Pi is a National Engineering Honor Society representing the entire engineering profession, and I am President of Ohio University’s chapter, Ohio Delta.

Tau Beta Pi is a great organization to be a part of because it is run by students from all 244 collegiate chapters across the United States! The purpose of the convention is to act as the governing body for the organization. We were separated into committees to focus on topics important to the organization. I was on the Resolutions committee, and one of our jobs was to make a skit for the end of convention to act as comedic relief. Who knew engineers could also act as playwrights!

One of the best parts of convention was meeting other engineering students and professors from all across the country and learning about their diverse experiences.

My second favorite part of convention was exploring the city of Providence. Providence is home to Brown University, and it is always a lot of fun to go and see a place unlike any you have been to before. I am thankful for the opportunity to network with other engineers and explore cities I may never have visited otherwise.

Providence, RI

On the Woonasquatucket River in Providence, RI.

Interviewing for an Internship

Natasha Norris

Natasha Norris,
Senior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 24 October 2015

Last week, I traveled to Nashville, TN for my third national Society of Women Engineers Conference and for the third year in a row, I was going to try to get an interview with the Boeing Company and hopefully, an internship.

I believe I was third in line to talk to Boeing when the career fair doors opened. It is such an intense feeling handing a recruiter your resume because you never know their personality and which cards you should play. I’ve had a few bad experiences and a few good ones, and this just time was one of the good ones.

The recruiter asked me a few questions about my resume and then concluded with “Why Boeing?” And I don’t believe I’ve ever given a more honest answer. I told her Boeing is on the top of my list, I’ve always wanted to work for Boeing. The first time I flew, I knew I wanted to work with planes and as I grew older, I knew it had to be Boeing. Your company is the number one supplier of planes to the world; you give people wings. Why not Boeing? It’s the best!

I don’t believe I’ve ever had a bigger smile on my face and fortunately, she had one too. I scored an interview.

They conducted a STAR interview. But, after the interview, they wanted to know my questions.

This is always a turning point in an interview; my advice is to always ask questions. It is an opportunity to show off your knowledge of the company and they can learn more of where you might fit through your concerns. I made sure I had a few questions lined up for the interview that were honest.

I must have impressed because 4 hours later my phone was receiving a call from Seattle, WA. I ran out of the restaurant and almost cried when the lady told me I had the internship! Dream come true! I had worked so hard to work for this opportunity all through my undergrad and it was finally paying off.

In conclusion, I just want anyone going to an interview to be completely honest with themselves and the recruiter: why do you want to work HERE? Why are we made for you and you for us?

Also, if you do not get the interview on the first try, like I did my first two SWE conferences, keep trying. Do not settle with a company you do not like, or if you do end up somewhere other than your desired company, still strive to make your dream company job happen. Yay Boeing!

Summer Research Work at Ohio University

Alyson Meister

Alyson Meister,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 2 October 2015

I spent my second summer in Athens this year. Last summer I stayed to take a class and I had a lot of fun, but this year I wanted to get more out of my time here and I did!
Not only did I take a class to get ahead and make my senior year a little easier, I also spent time doing research for a few professors. I worked on two projects over the summer with very different focuses, since I’m not exactly sure where I want to direct my career after graduation.

For one project, I worked with a team of students to design and build a test rig to collect data on an innovative particle capture system. Our system was specifically designed to capture coal fly ash which is typically done by Electrostatic Precipitators (ESPs) which are large, expensive, and require high voltages. This project required a lot of hands-on work in the machining labs, troubleshooting, and collaboration with students and professors.

I also did an independent study project dealing with the material properties of bones. This project was mostly computer-based work and involved writing MATLAB codes and running statistical tests on acquired data. I also completed an abstract for the Biomedical Engineering Society and will be presenting my work at their conference in Tampa, FL next week. This will be my first time presenting individual research work and I am really excited and nervous!

Overall I’d say my second summer in Athens was a success and I gained a broad range of skills and experiences that will benefit me in the future!

Institute of Navigation Conference

Natasha Norris

Natasha Norris,
Senior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 18 September 2015

This past week, I attended the Institute of Navigation Conference in Tampa, Florida. This is the first conference I have attended related to my research in avionics navigation. I co-authored a paper with my advisor discussing our research related to a high-gain dish antenna data collection of GPS signals. Moreover, the purpose of the conference for me was to realize if going into avionics navigation research was the right area of study when I go into graduate school next Fall.

I sat through a variety of presentations, from using the magnetic field combined with Wifi for locating yourself inside a building to a variety of ways to analyze the GPS signal and code. I was overwhelmed with all the knowledge and research being presented, but I definitely realized that this is what I want to do in graduate school.

The variety of topics got me excited for my future in research. I found there were so many problems still in the navigating world; though this might not sound like great news to you, it only sounds like I have more research to do to find solutions, which is wonderful to me.

While attending the conference, I noticed how few women were in attendance and that I was the only undergraduate attendee. On the first day, this intimidated me. First, these are the top engineers in navigation, how could I ever hold a conversation and seem at least a little intelligent? Secondly, I had never really experienced a situation before where I felt like a minority as a woman in the engineering world.

But as the conference went on, I had encouragement from everyone I met to continue my studies in navigation. Many told me stories of how they started and that I needed to remember that they had been in my seat before and it can only go up from there. They also encouraged me to attend a Women in Positioning, Navigation, and Timing meeting; the meeting encouraged women early in their PNT career to continue working and empower themselves.

Not only did I benefit in my research from this conference, but I grew in confidence in my knowledge, I learned that there is so much support in the navigation field for women, and I am sure about my path to avionics navigation research for my future graduate studies. This trip became the most beneficial experience I’ve had in my engineering career, and I extremely thankful to Russ College for this opportunity.

COUNT Seminar to Benefit my Research Work

Natasha Norris

Natasha Norris,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 1 June 2015

I recently traveled to Dayton, Ohio for a 3 day COUNT short courses seminar. I attended to learn more GPS-related topics to put towards my research. COUNT stands for Consortium of Ohio Universities on Navigation and Timekeeping. Professors and researchers from Ohio State University, the Air Force Research Laboratory, Miami University, and Ohio University discussed and presented on several key components needed to understand timing and navigation.

The seminar I found particularly interesting was the lecture on how a GPS receiver actually computes your current position. The lecturer walked through each step from receiving the GPS signal from your antenna to actually seeing your GPS signal above the noise floor. (The power level of the GPS signal is much lower than that of noise.) From there, your receiver can pull the GPS data because it is visible.

After the seminars, we found time to explore Dayton. We visited Press Coffee shop near the Oregon District of downtown Dayton. Delicious! Then we headed to Yaffa Grill. It had the best Mediterranean food I’ve ever tasted in the United States. I would definitely stop to eat there if you’re in the area. I even made a friend from downtown Dayton.

I’m fortunate to have these opportunities for travel through the Russ College and my research position. I wouldn’t have obtained these opportunities without being active in the Russ College community. Some advice from one college student to all future/current college students, make sure you become active in your college community. You never know what opportunities you’ll find through the connections you make.

NSBE National Conference

Lance Jackson

Lance Jackson,
Senior, Civil Engineering

Athens, OH 30 March 2015

Every year in the last week of March the National Society of Black Engineers (NSBE) host a national convention that includes all of the NSBE chapters across the nation. This past week I, along with 16 others, were fortunate enough to attend the 41st annual NSBE national conference, which was held in Anaheim, California.

NSBE

During these conferences, students are able to take part in plant/site tours which are given by nearby companies. There are a number of different professional development workshops that range from ones that help to refine interviewing skills to others that give tips on effective leadership.

NSBE

On top of this there are two career fairs that NSBE members may go to in search of potential employment with one of the companies that attend along with hospitality suites, which are held by the companies and allow students to get to know employees of the company in a slightly more personal setting. In our leisure time, we were able to explore the city; some went to Disneyland while others decided to spend their time relaxing on Huntington Beach.

Before it was all over, we ended up having 8 of our members receive interviews from the career fair and one member receiving a $500 scholarship. All in all I would say it was a great trip and personally enjoyed being surrounded by so many driven and passionate engineers.