Tag Archives: engineering orgs

Visit to Dayton

Allie Gabbard

Allie Gabbard,
Junior, Engineering Technology & Management

Athens, OH 7 April 2019

Being a part of student organizations has truly helped me to travel and see things that I would have never been able to do or gone to do on my own. In the fall, I had the opportunity to travel to Chicago with members of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers to see the International Manufacturing Technology Show. This is one of the largest conventions in the nation!

Not only did we have the opportunity to see the crazy new technology out there, but also I got to actually see the city of Chicago instead of just driving through. The best part of this trip was building some amazing friendships. The people I spent 10 hours with in the car are now my best friends.

Similar to the Chicago trip, this past weekend I represented SME again at a different event. This time I traveled with students from the Society Hispanic Professional Engineers and Renaissance Engineers to Russ Research Center located in Beavercreek, Ohio.

I had never seen this building and I live just south in Cincinnati. We had the opportunity to tour some of the companies working there and see their research. Triad Technologies, Adaptive Cooperation, WPAFB, and more presented to us.

After the long day of listening, we then went to Wright State and stayed in their dorms for the night. A throwback memory of freshman year for sure! The next morning, Dr. Pagan took us to the Air Force Museum. I had never been there and again, I live only a short drive from the base.

Walking up to the building, I felt so small. Each area could hold over 4,400 people. I could have spent a whole day in each area of that museum. It was honestly one of the coolest museums I have been through. I also got to walk through the Presidential planes!

It was truly an amazing experience and another one I will not forget. I am very thankful for being able to take trips like these and they have impacted me and my experience here at OU. I am also very thankful we have professors here that take the extra time to give us these kinds of experiences.

Human-Powered Vehicle Team

Tanner Wick

Tanner Wick,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 27 January 2019

Over winter break I helped finish the design of this year’s human powered vehicle for the upcoming 2019 ASME Human Powered Vehicle Challenge. Teams work throughout the year to design, manufacture, and test a vehicle that will compete in speed and endurance events alongside dozens of other teams from around the country.

This project is a true test of the student’s knowledge and understanding of the engineering design process. Each year, the team decides on product design specifications for what characteristics (weight, top speed, drag coefficient, etc.) the vehicle will have. This year’s bike was designed as a three-wheeled tadpole made from an aluminum frame and carbon fiber fairing. The frame includes a rollover protection system that prevents the rider from being injured in case the vehicle flips over. The fairing is designed to allow for minimal air resistance on the vehicle. This results in higher speeds and greater rider comfort.

After finishing the design over break, all materials for manufacturing were ordered. This meant the team could start building as soon as the semester started. The team is pushing a rigorous timeline so that there is ample time for testing and training before the competition in April. After placing 3rd in the previous three competitions, the team is excited and determined to place higher this year.

IEEE Student Professional Awareness Experience

Mia Wilson

Mia Wilson,
Senior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 15 October 2018

This past week, the local chapter of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) held their annual student professional awareness experience. Each year they hold this event with the hopes that students will attend and gain knowledge from current professionals. These professionals are looking to share their experiences with students at Ohio University to help them grow in their careers and in life.

This year we had Dr. Charles Alexander present on the possibilities of the use of Thorium, a resource believed to be the cleanest energy source currently available for use in the United States. He spoke about his career path, and how it led him to the work he is currently doing with this energy source. Dr. Alexander has played an important role in building our student branch, as this is the second time Dr. Alexander has visited Ohio University to present to our students.

Events like this are a great way to network with other students, and professionals. Usually there is free food involved (in this case it was Miller’s Chicken—a local fried chicken restaurant), allowing students to get fed while they build their network. These events are, also, a way to witness the possibilities a career in engineering can provide.

IEEE/HKN End-of-the-Year Event

Mollie Whitacre

Mollie Whitacre,
Senior, Computer Science

Athens, OH 22 April 2018

This past weekend, IEEE and HKN (Eta Kappa Nu) held a social event for the entire School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. This event welcomed all students and faculty to get together for a cookout.

In my five years, I was never aware of an event like this that took place for the whole department. It was a great experience to get to talk to professors outside of class and get to know them on a more personal level. Since all years of students were there, we also talked about the different classes people were taking. It was cool to see upperclassmen give advice on certain courses and talk to them about topics that they have already been through.

Attendance at the event was good with about ten faculty members and sixty students participating. The weather was great, and the burgers were even better! I hope they continue to hold this event in this future because it really brings the students and faculty closer together.

Creating for Good on My Coast-to-Coast Run

Illona Hartman

Illona Hartman,
Junior, Civil Engineering

Athens, OH 24 February 2018

While I am studying for my engineering classes and practicing for the field hockey team, I am also running around Athens in preparation for my summer plans. This summer, I am running with a team of college-aged runners from coast to coast: literally from San Francisco to Baltimore.

This 4,000+ mile journey in relay form will take us 49 days, which means I will run 8-12 miles on average a day. During this “4K for Cancer,” we will be raising money and awareness for cancer. The 4K is a program of the Ulman Cancer Fund for Young Adults (UCF) and this will be the 17th time UCF is sending young adults across the country.

In addition to the physical aspect of this program it will be a mental challenge as well, as my 10 month old infant cousin is currently battling myeloid leukemia.

4K Run

Studying abroad has been challenging ever since she, Leighton van Leeuwen, got diagnosed with cancer at the age of 6 months (September 2017). However, I found support in running for her and in my family away from home: Ohio University.

4K Run

Last month, the coed professional engineering fraternity Theta Tau and the Russ College of Engineering and Technology helped me set up a fundraiser in the ARC Atrium. For two days, we sold Dutch baked goods for donations and we recruited 25 students to become part of the international bone marrow registry!

4K Run

On top of this, I organized a few other fundraisers such as an online Yankee Candle sale, selling Russ College T-shirts and flowers for Valentine’s Day through Tau Beta Pi, an online sale for engraved baking supplies, a “donate my hair” auction, and a Santa Fest birthday celebration at home before I came back to the States. All of this has contributed to my current donation status of $5,700!

4K Run

4K Run

In order to secure my spot on Team Baltimore, I had to raise a $4,500 minimum goal. Even after achieving this goal, it is not in my nature to stop spreading the word. Therefore, I have some exciting fundraisers planned for the rest of the semester to finish off with a personal goal of $7,000. For instance, Chi Epsilon and I will host a fundraiser at Tavolino, and I am planning on running my first half marathon in Athens this April…

4K Run

Thus, I am extremely thankful of the opportunities given by the Russ College and the ongoing support they have given me. Something I hope everyone to experience!

For more information on my 4K you can visit my personal blog and my fundraising page:https://ulman.z2systems.com/illona-hartman

Preparing for My Final Semester

Matt McKenzie

Matt McKenzie,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 18 December 2017

As my senior year is now halfway completed, one place that I am looking to spend a little extra time in my last semester is helping others become better equipped for success. In my time here there has been one organization, the Human Powered Vehicle Team, that has helped me build up my skill set, learn and apply vast amounts of information outside of the classroom, and has given me opportunities I likely would not have otherwise had.

The Human Powered Vehicle team was found at Ohio University when I was a freshman by two graduate students. Following the first year and competition in Florida, myself and another sophomore at the time took leadership of the organization. In the last two-and-a-half years, both of us have grown immensely, but it has come time to pass on the torch again. In order to set up the organization for the best chance of success long term, the team has set up a system in which the new leaders are transitioned in before the previous leaders have left the university. This allows them to act as a mentor and help their successors learn the ropes a little before being thrown into the deep end per se.

With the upcoming semester being the last of my undergraduate career, I am really looking forward to doing my best to build crucial skills in future leaders to make not only this year, but years to come successful for the team.

Renaissance Engineers

Veronica Ammer

Veronica Ammer,
Junior, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Athens, OH 20 October 2017

My dad has an electrical engineering degree. I’m going for chemical. A lot of people that know us well usually say something along the lines of “the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree.” I understand where they are coming from, but to me, chemical and electrical engineering are on completely different wavelengths. I’m living in the realm of fluid mechanics and heat transfer while my dad is surrounded by systems and circuits. While both are necessary and cool careers, they are total opposites. Like night and day, cats and dogs, or Squirtle and Charmander.

When it came time for me to take Basics of Electrical Engineering, I knew I was in for it. Thermodynamics and mass balance were more my cup of tea than circuit analysis and Ohm’s law. The first exam did not go well. At all. I remember trying to calculate my grade to see if I would still even be able to get an A for the class. From then on, I stepped up in that class. I went to office hours, did more than the assigned problems, and poured over the books. My professor noticed my effort and toward the end of the semester he approached my friend and me with an awesome idea about how we could create for good while still at OU.

He invited us to become founding members of an organization called Renaissance Engineers. Our goal would be to create for good in the Athens community by solving problems with the application of our engineering knowledge and skills. The more Professor Vouzianas told us about the organization, the more excited I was to see his vision come true.

When I signed up, I did not know what I was getting into. A lot of hours were spent deliberating about bylaws, meeting times, and how to get Renaissance Engineers out there as an organization. From planning the first meeting to making the poster for the Involvement Fair, I got to be part of the inception. It is sometimes hard to devote a lot of time into something before you have the chance to see the results.

There is a learning curve to starting a new organization and a lot of hard work required. Be that as it may, so many students and professionals have joined the organization and that has meant so much to me.

One of my favorite parts of the organization is its interdisciplinary and inclusive nature. We are a mix of students and professionals, with a range of degrees from journalism to business to engineering. In the infamous “real world” that is often alluded to by college graduates, most people will work with others without the same technical background. That is why I believe it is so valuable to be a part of an organization that is more than just chemical engineering. It has certainly been worthwhile to get involved and I am honored to serve as Vice-President for such an innovative, service-based engineering organization.