Tag Archives: engineering orgs

IEEE Student Activities Conference

Mia Wilson

Mia Wilson,
Junior, Electrical Engineeering

Athens, OH 10 April 2017

This past weekend, I went with The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers (IEEE) to the annual Student Activities Conference (SAC) at Rowan University in Glassboro, New Jersey. It was honestly one of the best trips that I have ever gone on. Events like these are mostly for professional development, but for me it was so much more. It was a chance for me to get to know my fellow students and it was also a chance to get away from Athens for a little bit and explore a new city!

This year the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science fully supported us to represent Ohio University at SAC. There we got to attend seminars about various subjects, including ethics, leadership, and the Young Professionals Society.

We also got to meet students from other schools. We competed against them in a variety of events that tested our knowledge about physics, circuits and problem solving. We actually ended up winning third in the physics competition and got to bring home a trophy!

My favorite part of the trip, though, was getting to know my fellow members of IEEE. During the car ride and the stay in Glassboro, we got to bond in a way that we haven’t before. I think this was due, in part, to school still being a lingering thought in our regular socials and meetings. Since we were off campus and most of the weekend we were busy with the conference, we got to take a break from the stress.

I was very pleased to find out how welcoming and comfortable everyone was with each other. It made the bonding experience that much better. There were a lot of factors that went into what made this trip so successful, but I honestly think it was the group of people that went that made it one of my favorite weekends to date.

Hosting the IISE Regional Conference

Joshua Igwe

Joshua Igwe,
Senior, Industrial & Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 2 March 2017

Last weekend, Ohio University hosted the Great Lakes Regional Conference for IISE (the Institute of Industrial and Systems Engineers), the professional organization for Industrial and Systems Engineering majors.

Each spring, there is a conference hosted by one of the schools within each region. Ohio University is in the Great Lakes Region, which includes Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Indiana.

About 400 students gathered in Athens for a two days of networking, listening to speakers, and exploring the possibilities within the professional world.

The theme of this year’s conference was “Finding the IE in relief”. We explored how industrial engineering tools and skills can be used within humanitarian relief situations.

One of the professors in the Russ College Department of Industrial and Systems Engineering specializes in humanitarian logistics. He was the first speaker on Saturday morning. He discussed how his experience with natural disasters in Chile lead him to begin his studies in humanitarian logistics.

Later Saturday, there was a time to converse with a few recent graduates from the major who recently began working full-time. It was nice hearing their perspective, as I am going to be graduating later this spring. There were a few other break-out sessions and key-note speakers throughout the rest of the day.

I really enjoyed this conference as it helped expand my perspective of Industrial and Systems Engineering and presented an opportunity to network with students from different schools.

Being a Member of Eta Kappa Nu

Andrew Videmsek

Andrew Videmsek,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 17 January 2017

Last year myself and nine other Electrical and Computer Engineering students worked together to bring back our university’s chapter of Eta Kappa Nu. Eta Kappa Nu, also known as HKN, is the international electrical and computer engineering honors society of IEEE. It was founded back in 1904 at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, and the Delta Epsilon chapter here at Ohio University was established in 1960.

At the end of last year, I got the honor of being voted in as the chapter’s president, and since reestablishing the chapter, it has given my fellow members and I opportunities we could have never dreamed of. In spring of last year we took a trip up to Ann Arbor, Michigan, to attend the HKN Student Leadership Conference. While we were there we got to meet other HKN members from around the country and hear talks from engineers working at IEEE, Ford, US Power, and NASA.

In addition, just last month we got to the opportunity to host one of our very own EE professors, Dr. Michael Braasch, in a talk he titled “Whatever you do, don’t drink the tea!” In this special presentation, Dr. Braasch told stories about his travels across the country and across the world while teaching and doing research. It was a great event where we were able to bring EE students and faculty closer together.

At the end of last semester, we turned our doughnut sale fundraiser into a project to raise money for the Athens County Children Services Giving Tree Toy Drive. This enabled us to donate boxes of Legos to the ACCS to be distributed to local children in need.

For me, being a member of Eta Kappa Nu isn’t just about showing the work I have completed in school. It is about fine tuning my leadership skills, connecting with other engineers in industry, bringing the students and faculty closer together, and helping out the community we live in. Looking back on the organizations I have been part of in the past, HKN has been one of the few that have had a large impact on my day to day life, and one I will never regret joining.

Bonding in IEEE

Mia Wilson

Mia Wilson,
Junior, Electrical Engineeering

Athens, OH December 10 2016

Being a part of a student organization, such as IEEE, has given me many opportunities. I have gotten to take trips to different schools for conferences, even out of state, for free. I have gotten to lead projects and people to accomplish a goal. But of all of the things that I have gained from being a part of IEEE (the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers), the best reward is all of the friends I have made.

For our last IEEE social of the fall semester we all decided on going to Bdubs to get dinner for boneless wing night. Before this event, we were all pretty good friends. We would work on homework together, joke, and laugh, but at this event we started to learn about each other outside of the academic setting. It was so refreshing to get to know the person behind the student. We bonded over some wings, appetizers and ranch dressing. It really did reinforce that we are all in this together.

Ever since this social, our meetings have been more productive. People feel comfortable sharing their thoughts and opinions. And they like coming to meetings because they know they are surrounded by supportive friends. I am so glad that we ended up having this event and that it was so successful.

Museum of Discovery

Matt McKenzie

Matt McKenzie,
Junior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 30 October 2016

As the first semester of my junior year is more than halfway complete, there have been a number of changes in my life that have granted me more a little more time outside of classes. To fill that time, I have been focusing on improving some of my skill set such as time management, and have had the opportunity get more involved around the community as well.

One event that I was able to recently partake in took place at the Ohio Valley Museum of Discovery where students from the Russ College brought in their projects and engaged young minds. This event was a very cool way to engage children of all ages from the surrounding community in science, technology, engineering, aviation, and math (STEAM) fields.

As a leader of the Human Powered Vehicle team, I was there with our most recent vehicle where we were able to talk about the process of creating such a vehicle and even have some of the kids ride it around.

Museum of Discovery

There were a number of other groups and stations for the kids to stop at including The American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) where the kids were able to play with drone and flight simulators, an egg drop where kids built a device to stop an egg from breaking after a fall, and a maglev track where they were supposed to secure a rider from falling off a vehicle when it came to an abrupt halt utilizing only rubber bands.

Events like this are very gratifying for me as helping others is personally one of the most rewarding things I do and I hope to be able to continue and do more in the future.

Rocket Design and Engineering Team

Andrew Videmsek

Andrew Videmsek,
Junior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 15 October 2016

With classes now in full swing and midterms coming to an end, it’s always nice to take a small break from school and relax. One of the best ways for me to relax while still working on engineering projects is through the student organizations I am a part of.

Last weekend I and four other members of the Rocket Design and Engineering Team took the hour long drive down to Gallipolis, Ohio, to launch our level one and level two certification rockets. The rockets we launched went to a projected height of 3,800 feet and were designed to prove we have the knowledge to safely construct, launch, and retrieve high powered rockets.

Rocket Launch

While we were there we got the opportunity to do so much more than just launch rockets. We experienced firsthand what it was like to make last minute modifications due to weather conditions, got to work with and talk to experts in the industry, and even had a friendly competition with another engineering college.

With that being said it wasn’t all fun and games: we saw what happens when a rocket burns up on the pad due to a failed motor, and had to retrieve a rocket from a tree when its parachute got stuck on its return to earth.

Additionally, just this weekend was another major event for a student organization I am involved in. Our chapter of IEEE-Eta Kappa Nu, the Electrical and Computer Engineering Honors Society, held its induction for new members. Our school chapter, the Delta Epsilon chapter, dates back to 1960, and this induction ceremony added 8 new members to the long history. In addition, this induction marks my first official day as president of the chapter for the 2016-2017 school year.

Human-Powered Vehicle Team

Matt McKenzie

Matt McKenzie,
Junior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 24 September 2016

With the school year setting in, the American Society of Mechanical Engineers’ Human Powered Vehicle team has begun its quest for the top. Each year, around 35 universities compete in a series of rigorous events and races with the vehicles they have designed over the previous year.

As a leader of the OU team, my passion and goal is to continue to help young, aspiring engineers through the engineering process from research to testing, and ultimately to show off what Ohio University students have to offer.

In my previous two years’ experience, I have learned a lot about not only bicycles, but also the engineering process, including many items that I have not yet learned in the classroom environment.

As this year rolls in, and I continue on to my second year as a leader of the team, I am looking to pass on that information to younger members so they can continue leading the organization to success after I have moved on. One of the most gratifying parts of this organization for me is being able to pass on the knowledge I have gained to other members.

The process of designing, analyzing, manufacturing, and testing a vehicle is neither a simple nor short endeavor. As a leader of such an extracurricular group, I realize that time while in college is precious and a juggling act between classes, extracurricular activities, personal life, and even work. I have devoted much of my time to the organization and am very grateful to see new and returning members devoting theirs to the organization as well.

While there are still many unknowns and hurdles to overcome, I continue to look forward to passing on knowledge and seeing the ideas members come up with to solve the challenging issues they face, with the hopes of bringing home a win for Ohio University come competition time.