Tag Archives: jobs

Why This Summer is My Most Important

Gyasi Calhoun

Gyasi Calhoun,
Senior, Computer Science

Athens, OH 16 April 2018

Over the past three years I have spent my Summers at Hyland Software working as a software developer on the healthcare team. Most would say that my most important Summer/Internship is the last Summer as an intern. However, I think the most important Summer is this up and coming one because I’ll officially be a full-time software developer. All that hard work has paid off and I finally can get a standing desk, larger monitors, a shiny metal nametag, and not to mention that full-time salary!

Since I’ve interned for so many years I’ve seen a lot of my fellow interns become full time employees as I remained an intern until May 5, 2018 finally comes!

This Summer is so important because things become more serious. There’s
no more knockout basketball twice a day every day of the week or the feeling of relief knowing my project won’t actually be launched for outside users to use.

What I’m about to experience is really similar to a college basketball player entering the NBA (obviously with a lot less on the line and a lot less pay). College was great, but how can you help our team’s production professionally? Can you write code that is efficient, maintainable at a large scale and usable to users globally? I definitely think I can and the company who hired me thinks I can as well, otherwise they wouldn’t have hired me.

Now it’s my time to showcase my skills and what positive impact I can bring to the table. This Summer is my time to make a great first impression as a full-time developer and although I’ve interned for a while it’s time to put that coat on a hanger and put on my grown-up pants.

The Road to Job Acceptance: Personal Experience and Tips from an Engineering Undergraduate

Cami Jones

Cami Jones,
Senior, Industrial & Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 26 March 2018

Now that I’ve finally found and accepted a full-time job, it seems like an appropriate time to write about the process of actually finding a job. For all of you metrics people out there, here’s a quick “by the numbers” about my full-time job search.


  • 16 companies

  • 11 distinct resumes (includes revised versions & job-specific modifications)

  • 27 online applications

  • 4 candidate pre-screening “intelligence”/ “ethics” tests

  • 8 first-round interviews

  • 5 second-round interviews

  • 4 final interviews

  • 4 job offers

  • 20+ hours of driving to/from interviews

  • 7 automatic rejections

  • 12 applications still “pending”


I don’t know how it reads, but it sure did feel exhausting! And I was fortunate—I know some of my friends have applied to 100+ jobs online and are only just beginning to get interviews. For what it’s worth, I’ve compiled my own list of top 3 full-time job search tips below.

Students and parents alike, please note the following: online job searching is HARD even for well-qualified students. I believe that it’s imperative to “play the game” in a smart way to make the most of efforts made applying to jobs…otherwise it’s easy to get discouraged! It is my hope that the tips below will help serve as an introductory guide to “playing smart”.

Cami’s Top 3 Full-Time Engineering Job Search Tips:
1. Know yourself. It’s important to know your skills/interests AND weaknesses/dislikes when searching for and applying to jobs. Trust me, it’s no use to anyone if you apply to a job that you’re unqualified to perform or that you will be unhappy doing. Look for jobs that both appeal to your interests and require skills that you feel confident you have. It’s a plus if you actually
have prior experience using these skills from an internship or co-op!

Avoid applying for jobs that sound boring or require too many skills you don’t possess. At the end of the day, if you get an interview for a job you want to be excited (not reluctant to “have to” interview) and you want to feel ready to knock it out of the park – not worry that they will discover you’re unqualified!

2. Know the system. The truth is that if you’re applying for jobs online, it is highly unlikely that a human will be the first to view your resume. These days, there are sneaky Human Resources (HR) software tools called Applicant Tracking Systems (ATS) that will “read” your resume and spit out a summary for the HR manager before anyone will see it. This summary needs to match the specific job description for you to get a call to interview…or to even get a real person to
review your qualifications!

If you’ve heard that you should make your resume “visually appealing” that’s still true if you are handing it out (or emailing it) to prospective employers. However, the formatting that makes your resume appealing may be a big reason that the ATS will reject your application! Many of these ATS systems cannot process documents with sophisticated formatting and therefore will not be able to read/summarize much of your content. AKA: even if you are perfectly qualified, you won’t get a call to interview!

Be SURE to create and use a plain text (unformatted) version of your resume to be submitted online. A helpful resource for creating a resume that both an
ATS and human can easily read can be found here (in step 2).

Once I started following these ATS guidelines, I started getting calls to interview. Before I used these techniques—crickets. I highly recommend doing your own research about ATS!

3. Use your network. If someone you know has connections to a job that you are interested in, reach out to them! From a company’s perspective, if someone who already works for them recommends someone for a job, it shows that the person is already trusted at some level. This takes some pressure off of the HR folks looking to hire for a position.

From your perspective, in many cases you can skip that pesky online application (and ATS scan) and have your resume placed in the hands of someone in HR who might actually read it! Again, if someone is willing to help you with this—take them up on it. In all transparency, this is how I got my foot in the door for three of my five internships and even the full-time position I accepted!

At Ohio University, we have a number of networking opportunities. The best, in my opinion, is building relationships with older students and alumni while still in school. Building up a good reputation with those entering the workforce before you for being a hard worker and someone who is easy to talk to can go a long way in obtaining your “dream job” later on!

Again, this is how I heard about the full-time job I accepted. An alumnus from our ISE department reached out through one of our professors to see if anyone was interested in working for Akron Children’s Hospital as an Operational Excellence Analytics Specialist and I jumped on the opportunity to send my resume her way! She sent my resume to her boss, and I had an interview set up a few days later. The rest is history.

Best of luck in your future (or current) job search!

Interviewing with Parker Hannifin

Emily Morello

Emily Morello,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 23 January 2018

This past September, I spoke to Parker Hannifin at the Ohio University career fair. At the end of our conversation, the recruiter told me to apply to the position as soon as possible because they would be conducting on-campus interviews in a few months.

I did as he said, and a few weeks later found out I was selected to interview at the beginning of November. The men I interviewed with informed me that they were going to select a few top candidates from the interviews that day to interview again at the Global Headquarters in Cleveland. I felt pretty good about my interview with them; however, I was unsure if I would be selected.

A week or so later, I received an email from Parker Hannifin inviting me to a banquet in January and a full day of interviews to follow. I was thrilled!

Over break I started doing more research on the position and company to educate myself before the big day. The banquet was wonderful. It consisted of managers and a group of employees who had recently graduated from the Technical Sales Associate position. I learned a lot about the position and became even more excited. I knew it would be the perfect job for me.

The interview day sounded intimidating, but ended up being quite enjoyable. Each finalist had six different interviews starting at 7:30 am and ending at 1:30 pm. The interviews were for different divisions in Parker Hannifin.

After the interviews, one of the managers told all the finalists we would
hear back from them within the next few weeks with either an offer or explanation as to why it did not work out.

I felt good about the interviews, but was still a little worried I would not get selected. As I was driving home, my worries diminished. I received a phone call from a manager in the Sporlan Division, telling me they had decided to extend an offer to me and I would receive the written offer on Monday.

I had no words. I was so excited!

I went over the offer for a few days and decided to accept. On June 4th, 2018, I will start working for the Sporlan Division of Parker Hannifin in Washington, MO for my departmental orientation. I will work there until July 10th, then get relocated to Cleveland for 4-6 weeks to begin my Technical Sales Associate orientation with all the other TSAs that were selected. From there, I will rotate the US and get located in my permanent position in November.

I am so thankful for this opportunity and cannot wait to begin this next chapter of my life.

Life Decisions

Caroline Wilson

Caroline Wilson,
Senior, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Athens, OH 28 March 2017

This semester I have been faced with making huge life decisions. As someone who is pretty indecisive in general, this has basically been a nightmare.

For the past 4 years of my life here at Ohio University, I have had a vision of what my life would look like when I graduated. This semester forced me to evaluate whether that vision still rings true to me. Making the choice between industry and graduate school has been one of the most difficult decisions I have ever had to make. I am a big believer in gut feelings, but in these past few months it sometimes felt like my gut was refusing to talk to me.

What helped me come to my final decision was the enormous support from everyone around me. I am the kind of person that wants to know absolutely every piece of available information before I am willing to make a final decision. This is not a particularly useful personality trait in situations where there are a lot of unknowns.

The reason I’m writing this blog post is that I think my situation probably resonates with a lot of incoming freshmen who might not know what the right path is for them. I have two things to say which might ease your worries.

First of all, I would like to say that I reached the decision to accept a job offer because of the unwavering support and patience of my academic advisor here at OU, Dr. Doug Goetz. His impact on my experience in the Russ College cannot be understated.

In these past few weeks, he has met with me every time I felt uncertain or wavered in my decision. He has answered emails, asked for input from his colleagues, and generally been the greatest ally I could have asked for at such a critical point in my life. Ohio University and the Russ College have put me into contact with some of the most incredible people in my life: people that were willing to fight for me and who were there for me during every step of my college experience.

That leads me to my second point: coming to Ohio University was the single best decision that I have ever made. It meant leaving my family behind and flying across the country to a place where I didn’t know a single other person. It also meant that I found a second home.

As I am preparing to leave Athens for my new job as a process design engineer at Kiewit Engineering Group Inc. in Kansas City, I am definitely sad to be closing this chapter of my life, but I also know that my experiences at Ohio University have prepared me to take on the challenges that this next chapter may present.

I wish the best of luck to anyone who might be making those big decisions in their life, and I hope that the experiences of myself and the other Ambassadors might be helpful in making that choice!

Moving to Pittsburgh

Kevin White

Kevin White,
Senior, Industrial & Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 26 January 2017

Over Winter break, I got the phone call that I will remember for the rest of my life. I was offered a full-time Industrial Engineer position with FedEx Ground in Pittsburgh, PA…and I accepted the position. I interned with FedEx Ground for the last 3 summers and I loved every second of my experiences. Working there full-time is such an amazing opportunity and I can’t wait to get started.

Working in Pittsburgh full-time means that I am going to move to Pittsburgh, which has always been a lifetime goal of mine. Shortly after accepting the job offer, my mom and I took a whole day and toured about 10 apartments around the area for me to live in. As an engineering major, of course I had my clipboard with me for every apartment and was being way too analytical when it came to the square footage and the pricing. I want to be close to work and close to downtown, so finding a perfectly located apartment was a challenge.

At the end of the day, I sat down and evaluated my top 3 apartments and now am waiting to send in an application. This was an eye-opening experience for me because I saw all of these costs that I am going to be responsible for while entering the real world. As I graduate in April, I will now be transitioning into the next chapter of my life and I am very excited. It has been a great 4 years at Ohio University and the relationships that I have built with the students and faculty here will last a lifetime.

Getting Ready to Leave

Steve Toth

Steve Toth,
Senior, Engineering Technology and Management

Athens, OH 22 April 2016

Today was my last day of class as college student, meaning a week from tomorrow I will be walking across the floor of the Convocation Center as I graduate from Ohio University. This experience is kind of a bittersweet one, one that I’ve never really had before.

Soon I will be starting a new chapter in my life’s book. One not centered around waiting on classes to start or end. It’s both exciting and scary as I will be coming into a whole new batch of variables.

The first few pages of this chapter will be finding an apartment for my fiancée and I while we remodel the farm house. Shortly thereafter, I will be starting my “big-boy job” at Honda.

With all of these huge changes coming in a very short period of time, I’m sure things will be hectic but I know that my experiences here at Ohio University will be some of my most cherished memories and that the Russ College has prepared me for life after college. For the last time, this is Steve Toth signing off. Stay classy, Bobcats.

Drago Cvijetinovic

Drago Cvijetinovic,
Senior, Aviation

Athens, OH 18 April 2016

With the end of the year approaching, and graduation only about two weeks away, I can’t help but think about how all of this is coming to an end. About five years ago, I was studying day in and day out for college admission tests, thinking about which college I wanted to go to, and writing down pros and cons for a number of different universities.

It would be fair to say I may have shed a few years off my life from the levels of stress I had thinking about all this. It’s not easy to make these large financial decisions that impact the rest of your life, especially at the age of 18.

There was always a little part of me that wanted to come to Ohio University, maybe because I had an older sibling that went here too. The idea of college was intimidating at first, but coming down for Sibs Weekend as a high school senior, spending time with my sister and her “college friends” was a huge encouragement.

OU Sibs Weekend 2011
Sibs Weekend 2011

Despite that, I didn’t want to make a decision that was purely based on one good weekend. But when I added that weekend to the great Aviation program, to the comfort I felt on campus, to the Athens student community, my decision was simple.

From start to finish, I never stopped meeting people. I wasn’t aware until I was on my own how many different types of people there were, the way they thought, and how they perceived life. The people that had the biggest impact on me were the ones who thought differently, and I loved that.

Despite not thinking alike, I find myself to this day with the same group of friends that I made day one in Ewing Hall. We all came from different backgrounds but we shared similar core values: a belief that we’re good people, a want to strive for greatness, and a need to help each other along the way.

It’s almost like having another family. It’s one of those things that’s difficult to describe, possibly because it’s a not tangible, but it’s definitely one of those unique traits that a university like OU holds.

Now that the year is coming to an end, it’s time to grow up and think about the future. Just this past week, I’ve successfully completed my commercial pilot certificate—I’m officially employable! Therefore, starting immediately, I’m starting my Flight Instructor training. This fall, I’ve committed to staying in Athens for a year to be a Flight Instructor for the university.

After the Checkride
After my commercial checkride

Overall, coming to Ohio University was a remarkable experience. I was able to get the degree that I dreamed about as a young boy but I also took away a lot more than what I initially paid for. I was able to become the person I wanted to be: confident, assertive, and an advocate for others in need.