Tag Archives: non-engineering classes

Scuba Class

Emily Morello

Emily Morello,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 5 March 2018

Each semester of college, I usually take about 5 classes. Most of them are engineering courses straight from the Mechanical Engineering flow chart found on the website for OU, but I always try to squeeze in one different class. For example, I took a dance class for a fine arts credit freshman year, two courses for my scholar’s program (Margaret Boyd Scholars) on Women in Leadership, an entrepreneurship class last year, a business consulting class to study abroad in Greece, and this semester a SCUBA class.

SCUBA class consists of an online class and a lab for two hours once a week. Every few weeks we meet in a lecture for two hours before the lab to go over important topics, such as learning how to use equipment, dive tables, and an exam review.

The lab is my favorite part of the class. In lab, we put on our equipment and learn all the skills necessary for scuba diving. Some of those include surface dives, regulator breathing, buddy breathing, water entries, and bailout. I am usually exhausted after each lab from swimming and carrying around all the equipment.

One of the reasons I decided to take this course is because I have always loved the water, but sometimes don’t participate in water activities because I don’t like being cold. I bought a wet suit so I have no excuse now. SCUBA has taught me how to be a more patient and relaxed person because if you aren’t relaxed when SCUBA diving, lots of things can go wrong. At the end of course, I can even get certified if I pass my pool and written exams.

Acting Fundamentals

Veronica Ammer

Veronica Ammer,
Junior, Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering

Athens, OH 5 November 2017

I love my engineering classes. They are challenging and engaging. I feel like my limits are being pushed and expanded as my problem-solving skills are put to the test. However, sometimes, I need some variation in my day. This semester, it’s my acting fundamentals class, THAR 1130.

I registered for the class after hearing my roommate rave about it. I enjoyed musicals in high school so I thought it would be fun to work monologues and do scene work again. Though musical rehearsals were a huge source of stress during high school, my acting class always leaves me in a good mood.

In this class, it’s hard not to be friends with everyone. There’s a very welcoming environment and most of the class is spent interacting with each other in various over-the-top activities.

My favorite game is pass the movement. We stand in a circle and one person makes a movement accompanied by a sound and everyone copies it one at a time around the circle. As the class progresses, the movements become bigger and more outrageous.

Our first assignment of the semester was to find a portrait that wasn’t anyone famous or someone we know. After scouring Google imagines for a solid fifteen minutes, I found it: the perfect picture. The portrait was taken in the 1920s and featured a burly man climbing out of a sewer with a rifle in one hand and a dead rat in the other. We got to make a back story for our portraits, write a monologue and then become our character to deliver the monologue.

For an hour and twenty minutes every Tuesday and Thursday, I can forget about the stresses of college life and just be my goofy self with twenty other students.

Physics and Open Mic

Jordan Osman

Jordan Osman,
Senior, Computer Science

Athens, OH 22 October 2017

An interesting non-engineering class that I have decided to take this semester is physics. It has really taught me to view our world in a different perspective and I believe that perspective is really the best thing one can take from a class.

Moreover, it’s nice to take a class that offers a crash course in technical writing. Although you do go over it in in the engineering classes we
take here, you never really get the chance to actually test and make sure if you have good technical writing skills, and my physics class is a helpful check for that.

Away from classes, I do do weekly open mics with a group of kids, and that’s a lot of fun. Last week I played with my friend Elli at the front room coffee shop and it was packed. The crowd was great and it’s always nice to be able to show something you’ve spent a lot of time refining and tweaking. I plan on continuing to do that with my group of open-mic friends all over Athens.

I’m really looking forward to Dads Weekend because of all the dads we ended up meeting through athletic events here on campus. My roommates and I plan on having a Dads Weekend cookout and inviting all the dads. It should be a lot of fun and I’m looking forward to it.

Global Consulting Program

Emily Morello

Emily Morello,
Junior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 19 February 2017

Out of all the courses I am taking this semester, my favorite is my Global Consulting Program Greece Course. It’s not that I don’t enjoy engineering–I find all my courses very interesting and have great professors. It is, however, refreshing having a class that is not math or science based.

I will be studying abroad in Thessaloniki, Greece for two weeks in May for a global consulting internship through the College of Business. Before we leave for the trip, it is required for all students to attend a course that teaches us about the program.

The class meets every Monday from 6-8 pm. The first hour is dedicated to learning everything we will need to know before starting our consulting project in Greece. We were each assigned a team of four or five students to submit mini assignments throughout the semester. Some of our assignments include a team charter; country and city report; pestle analysis; decision matrix; and a presentation at the end. This course is set up similar to a “cluster”, which are team based courses that business students take for a semester at Ohio University.

The second part of the course is to learn the Greek language. This is my favorite part of my Mondays. Our professor is very personable and passionate about this trip. He makes the class fun so everyone is willing to learn. We started out learning the Greek alphabet and then learned how to spell our names. Next, we were taught simple words to hear how Greek sounds.

Each week we add on to the previous week’s topics. We learn a little about the history, cultural differences, and enhance our vocabulary. Our final exam for this course is to be able to say each phrase on a sheet that is front to back that we received the second week of class.

I am very interested in the business section of class. Ultimately, I would like to earn my Masters in Business so I can become an Engineering Manager at some point in my career. I believe that these courses and this internship will help prepare me for my MBA in the future.

I am also very excited about the travel. Like I’ve stated in my previous posts, I do enjoy traveling a lot. I cannot wait to see a different part of the world and grow as an individual. Lastly, I am very excited for all the great relationships that I will gain due to this experience.

Globalization and the Developing World

Jane Oberhauser

Jane Oberhauser,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 9 November 2016

This semester, I am taking a non-engineering class called “Globalization and the Developing World”. (GEOG 1310) The class was recommended to me by a friend because of the passionate and knowledgeable professor and interesting content.

It’s a class taught by the geography department, and it’s similar to a human geography class I took my sophomore year. As the name suggests, this class looks at the effects of globalization on the developing parts of the world. This is especially interesting to me as an engineer who would love to “Create for Good” somewhere in a developing part of the world.

This class has been interesting and challenging. It’s not challenging in the way that my conceptually difficult classes are, but it forces my eyes open to the incredibly awful things that happen in the world. We had a section on child labor, where we learned that children are often paid incredibly small amounts for working day in and day out in unhealthy working positions and conditions.

We are currently learning about the unrest in the Democratic Republic of Congo. This poses an interesting moral conflict, where all of electronics that we are using and designing as engineers contain a mineral that almost solely comes from this area. The mineral is fought for and genocidal wars are waged because of it. This all goes back to globalization when we realize that everything here is so interconnected. How can I currently be typing on a computer that is full of this mineral that caused so many unfair deaths? How should I feel about this? It makes me feel sick, but what am I to do?

These things, and many more injustices in the world, make my soul crave for justice to come. When or how that will happen isn’t in my hands, but I do want to do whatever I can to help. In my everyday life, I can buy products that are certified fairly traded. In my engineering future, what if I could design an inexpensive rug weaving loom that allowed children to sit in ways that don’t deform their growing bodies? Those are just small examples, but I’m thankful for this class opening up my eyes.

How OU has Changed Me

Ali McCormick

Ali McCormick,
Senior, Electrical Engineering

Athens, OH 27 April 2016

With graduation only days away, I’ve had the opportunity to reflect on how the last four years I’ve spent at Ohio University have affected me as a person.

Coming into Ohio University, I was very timid and soft-spoken. I had a difficult time putting myself out there because I generally kept to myself. I remember taking an introduction to ethics course and the final for the class being to present your beliefs on ethics to the class. (I actually had considered dropping the class, that’s how badly I disliked speaking in front of people.)

Back then, presenting in front of a classroom was the end of the world for me. Not only because of my anxiety of public speaking, but also due to my belief that what I had to say didn’t always seem that important.

The following years I spent at Ohio University changed my opinion on personal voice and, also my life, for the better. I went on to join Theta Tau, the professional engineering fraternity on campus. Through this, I gained friendships that I know will last me a lifetime.

I focused heavily on putting myself into situations that were out of my comfort zone, which gave me the opportunity to grow as an individual. I made sure to put everything I had into my studies, which lead me to obtain a Co-Op at L-3 Communications in Cincinnati, Ohio. I took the experience from there and brought it back to school with me, and applied it to classes.

But, the most important aspect of my college career comes from the opportunity of participating in Engineering Ambassadors. I was nominated for the position at the end of my sophomore year and performed the duties during my junior and senior years.

The position requires strong speaking skills, which as I discussed earlier weren’t as developed back then. I remember that during my interview for the position, I expressed that while my speaking skills may not be as impressive as the fellow applicants, my overall passion to better those skills was immeasurable.

The opportunity to speak with prospective students and parents strengthened my interpersonal skills in unimaginable ways and just the ability to lead students into a direction that will ensure success is extraordinary.

My voice was given purpose and pushed me to pursue opportunities that otherwise would have been unobtainable, and for that I can thank Ohio University.

Health Care and Engineering

Paige Preske

Paige Preske,
Senior, Industrial and Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 14 December 2015

As an Industrial Engineer, you can work in a hospital setting doing a variety of things. Everything from inventory control, setting time standards, and developing strategies for patient scheduling can be a part of the job description. I was interested in working in a hospital setting so I made Health Care my PCA (Professional Concentration Area) to specialize my Industrial & Systems Engineering degree.

To date I’ve been pleasantly surprised by the health care classes at Ohio University. I found the classes to be very interesting and relevant to the times. This semester I took HLTH 2170 Health System Organization, Financing, and Delivery, which was very helpful in my PCA.

The class was centered on the U.S. health care system and covered the trends in health care as well as future perspectives against historical background. In addition to trends, we learned about the key components in the health care system: patients, providers, and the stakeholders. This defined health care as a system by recognizing the components and how they relate, which allows me to view and improve the system as an Industrial and Systems Engineer.

The awesome part of this PCA is how relevant it is to the times. Tune into the Presidential debates and you’ll hear plenty of healthcare questions and what direction our country needs/is moving in. Besides health care, the tie-in of insurance and benefit packages are another hot topic within the field.

Knowing that I’m learning and moving towards a field that is so prevalent makes the final semester of college so much more exciting and meaningful.