ME Senior Design Success

Marissa Singley

Marissa Singley,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 19 April 2014 – Senior Design is coming to a close. We recently delivered our prototype. It was a success. The ATCO employees and staff loved it. We were so happy to see the final product finished and working. The plates were cleaned with ease and ready to be painted and made into a passion flower! Seeing the positive reaction of our friend with disabilities to all of our hard work made it completely worth it.

Watch our prototype in action: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fyTWlYW12Fc

Actually, it made the entire 4 year mechanical engineering journey worth it. Senior design proved that we can overcome controversy and troubleshoot with the team provided. It took all the skills that I have learned and applied them to a real life situation. It taught me patience and confidence in myself and my engineering skills. I learned about all aspects of engineering, including design, research, and manufacturing. I have had so much fun this past year! This class has made me look forward to my engineering career.

ME Senior Design Team

ISE Senior Capstone

Connor Mitchell

Connor Mitchell,
Senior, Industrial and Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 17 April 2014 – Every year senior students in the Russ College are required to complete a senior capstone project as part of their course requirements. The senior capstone project allows students to use the skills they have learned throughout their career and apply them to a real world situation. Normally the group is overseen by an adviser, but the team is responsible for coming up with their own ideas and possible ways to analyze and fix the problem. In most majors and in my case, teams are formed and then an outside client is determined. The client then gives the team the problem and the project begins.

I’m a senior in Industrial and Systems Engineering. Industrial Engineers try to make processes and systems more efficient, which in the end, saves money for the company. This year my team was selected to help out Ohio University’s Environmental Health and Safety Department. The team was assigned to study the variability behind exterior handicapped actuators as well as card swipes that will replace most exterior keys that all students use.

To give an idea of how long these projects last, Industrial and Systems Engineering projects begin in November and end right before spring finals in May. First we met with our client and he assigned us our project. Then we defined the problem and set out to accomplish our task. Next we collected our data, which consisted of measuring heights and positions of actuators and card swipes around campus. After that, we conducted an experiment to determine the optimal height and position of the actuator and card swipe. After analyzing the data, we made suggestions and a proposed plan to our client.

I summarized this entire project in a few sentences within this blog; however, this project took many months of hard work and team cooperation. I was able to apply my engineering knowledge and skills that I learned during my four years as an engineering student to a real life project.

Springtime for Ohio

Steven Crane

Steven Crane,
Senior, Engineering Technology and Management

Athens, OH 16 March 2014 – Good moooooooorning students!

It’s spring time for Ohio and Engineering! Even though it’s still chilly (because of this freaky winter we’ve all been experiencing) Athens, Ohio still has many activities to do. This past weekend I went for a hike at Stroud’s run, which is only 5 minutes away from campus.

Stroud's Run

With such a nice part just minutes from campus, I like to use Strouds Run as a way to unwind. After completing a 5 mile hike around the park, I felt much better! It’s week 12 in the semester and it can get frustrating at times.

It’s important to remember why it’s important to take a step back sometimes and breath; if you don’t, you just might burn out.

Stroud's Run

The semester is finally winding down and projects are starting to approach their due dates. I’m looking forward to the next time I go on a hike, because the next time I go on a hike the semester might be over.

Stroud's Run

I’m looking forward to what the summer holds in front of me. Right now I’m looking at working Gosiger for an internship, night school for the first half of the summer, and knee surgery (yay!). I’m going to be very busy this summer, but that’s the way I like it!

I hope that all have a good summer ahead of you: whether it’s working, extra-curricular practice, or just enjoying it!

Stroud's Run

Good news is…I only fell once!

Faculty-Student Wiffle Ball

Scott Kostohryz

Scott Kostohryz,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH 9 April 2014 – As the year comes to a close, it was a sight to see our Department Chair, Dr. Kremer, sliding into home off a hit into left field. With the faculty out of their element today and on the field, the Mechanical Engineering professors and some students had an exciting game of Wiffle ball outside of the Convocation Center. Outside of the research, papers and assignments, the professors and students enjoyed an exciting Second Annual Mechanical Engineering Student Advisory Board Student/Faculty Wiffle Ball Game.

Through all of the bumps and bruises, it was great to see us all “out of our element” and strengthening the bond outside of the classroom. This isn’t the first thing the faculty has done with the Mechanical Engineering students but it will be a highlight for me. I don’t know of a campus where you can have this kind of interaction with professors. It was quite a thrill.

Wiffle Ball

Today was also a great day for our Senior Design team. We delivered our project to ATCO for a test run with the clients. It was excellent to see the smiles it brought to the advisors’ faces and how excited the clients were to use it. This new metal cleaning machine will replace removing ink by hand, pressure washing, and will now allow those with disabilities to be part of the cleaning. All while improving the cleaning process and allowing ATCO to clean year-round. All the hard work and energy was worth it to see one of the clients, Eathan, light up and excited to use our new machine.

ME Senior Design

Caving Trip

Ben Taylor

Ben Taylor,
Senior, Industrial and Systems Engineering

Athens, OH 9 April 2014 – I’m sure many people wouldn’t typically associate the terms “engineer” and “outdoorsman” with one another. And in my case, many people would be spot on with that assumption; I am an engineer, but by no means am I an outdoorsman. Sure, I love being outside on a nice day or playing a little sand volleyball in the summer months, but you certainly won’t find me running a 5k or hiking up a mountainside.

As my career at Ohio University is winding down, I thought that I needed to go outside of my comfort zone a little bit. One of my roommates is an outdoor recreation major and at the end of last semester he suggested that I enroll in a caving class for the current spring semester. He had gone on one of the trips before and said that it was quite an experience, so I decided to pull the trigger and sign up.

After a quick two weeks of classes in late February to early March, myself, eight other students (my roommate included), our teaching assistant (TA) Hunter, and our professor Matt (a super cool PhD student) were in a van driving to Radford, Virginia to face a weekend worth of camping and caving. After setting up camp and spending the night on Friday, we woke up early Saturday morning and drove to our first cave, Starnes.

Starnes is a cave deep in a hillside that is located on a farmer’s property just outside of Radford. We hiked about a half-mile through the farmer’s property and then rappelled down into the cave (after first obtaining the farmer’s permission, of course). The moment I entered the cave and got out of the sunlight, I could feel the presence of the cave’s immense darkness set in. Once you get a few hundred feet into the cave, climbing over rocks and through crevices, there is absolutely zero light and only darkness.

We all wore headlamps and carried two forms of backup light as a precaution, along with lunch, water, extra batteries, extra clothes, and empty bottles in case a bathroom transaction needed to be made (you can’t just go anywhere in a cave).

The experience of climbing through these caves with this group of students I barely knew was exciting and truly enjoyable. The instructor Matt did a great job making sure that we were all comfortable and led the group so that we not only were able to explore the caves ourselves and make our own decisions about where to explore, but also so we were able to get to know one another along the way and trust one another to have each other’s backs when we needed help.

The caves were extremely wet and the terrain was a constant struggle. You had to be very conscious of every step you took. Also, there were some areas, called “squeezes,” which were extremely narrow areas where you had to crawl army-style to get to the next open area (talk about claustrophobia). There was one particular squeeze that was so tight that you had to put one arm in front of you and one arm to your side and essentially nudge your way inch-by-inch through a 15-foot passageway into the next room. If I learned anything about myself on this trip, it was that I am not claustrophobic like I thought I was!

Caving truly was an incredible experience and I am glad I was able to take on the challenge with my roommate and other students from Ohio University. I will always remember that weekend in Radford, Virginia.

Benefits of Theta Tau

Claire Hall

Claire Hall,
Junior, Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering

Athens, OH 8 April 2014 – By the end of my freshman year, I had close friends I had been in class with all year. Some of them had joined an engineering fraternity and somehow convinced me to try it. Theta Tau turned out to be one of the best things I could have gotten involved in at Ohio University and Russ College.

Theta Tau is a professional engineering co-ed fraternity founded in 1904 with the Ohio University, Rho Beta chapter being established in 1988. All different majors in Russ College can join the organization and it’s a great way for different majors to meet each other and learn about different disciplines. The current exec board is composed of Chemical Engineering, Civil Engineering, and Computer Science majors.

Theta Tau

It’s also a great organization to learn from older students and seniors in Russ College. Learning leadership skills and gaining experience in organizing and communicating with others are benefits from involvement in Theta Tau. The professional fraternity is involved in community service in the Athens community, professional development activities on campus and also intramural sports.

I’m currently the chair for community service and this year we have helped at the Pawpaw Festival, supported a Good Works Friday Night Life dinner, and will be participating in the Athens B-day.

  • The Pawpaw Festival is a community event held at Lake Snowden in honor of Ohio’s state fruit, the pawpaw. Animals are not allowed to be taken in to the festival so the local Friends of the Dog Shelter dog-sit while their owners are able to walk around. We volunteered as a group, watching over and playing with the dogs.
  • Good Works puts on a Friday Night Life dinner sponsored by a different group every week. One week this winter, we cooked a chili dinner for 150 community members at Friday Night Life.
  • Athens Beatification Day is a large volunteer event organized by OU’s Student Senate which involves over 2,000 students giving back to the Athens community. Theta Tau has participated as a group the past couple of years.

Joining Theta Tau my sophomore year has given me the chance to become close friends with engineers in other disciplines, to learn from seniors in Chemical Engineering and develop some friendships I’m sure will last much longer than our time here at OU.

Theta Tau

Graduate School for Biomedical Engineering

Talli Topp

Talli Topp,
Senior, Mechanical Engineering

Athens, OH dd Month 2014 – Thinking about graduation is becoming all more frequent and all more real. I can’t believe that it is just a few weeks away. My plan for after graduation is to continue onto graduate school and study Biomedical Engineering. Prior to starting graduate school, I have a summer internship in Maine working at the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard. I am very excited about both my internship and attending graduate school. The two fields are very different from one another, but I feel like they will both present me with a unique challenge and keep me very engaged, so I look forward to each of them!

Making a decision between getting a job right after graduating and going straight to graduate school as a very tough decision, and one that took me a very long time to make. I went to a job interview after being accepted to graduate school, and the benefits and stability seemed so enticing. But, after thinking it over and talking with a lot of different people all with conflicting opinions, I realized that what I ultimately want to do with my life is help people. The field of Biomedical Engineering is the best avenue I can think of to do that, and graduate school is the first step in doing so. After finally making this big decision, I am very happy to have the stress of not knowing what I will be doing next year off of my shoulders!